What to Do When You Reach a Weight Loss Plateau

Phat in My 40's Health Guide November 10, 2010
  • When trying to think of something to write about this week, a couple things keep coming to mind - bicycles and back pedals.   Do you remember the bicycles we had as kids?  The ones where the pedals served as the brakes?   You could be riding along and when you wanted to stop, you w...

2 Comments
  • Donna-1
    Nov. 13, 2010

    It seems like every phase of life (since age 12) has brought with it new weight concerns.  Puberty.  High school.  College.  Marriage.  Divorce.  Living with parents.  Independence.  There is a common thread: stepping on the scales every morning.  And sometimes the numbers there control how I feel about myself: whether...

    RHMLucky777

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    It seems like every phase of life (since age 12) has brought with it new weight concerns.  Puberty.  High school.  College.  Marriage.  Divorce.  Living with parents.  Independence.  There is a common thread: stepping on the scales every morning.  And sometimes the numbers there control how I feel about myself: whether I feel worthy or beautiful or "in control" of my habits; sometimes the numbers freak me out.

     

    But one thing good about keeping up with my daily weight (I write it on a calendar) is that I can look back to last year at this time and see no, I really am not fatter.  I haven't lost any, but I haven't gained either which is important.  In the back of my mind somewhere is always the sense that I am bigger now than I have ever been.  But it's not true.  My all-time high was 186.  This morning I was 170.  And I hover between 160 and 170.  I hate that feeling of defeat when I go over that, and when I go under that it still feels like defeat is one binge away.

     

    You must take steroids.  I must take an antipsychotic.  They can both cause weight gain.  Mine causes an ungodly appetite 24x7.  I try to control it but I start eating again w/o even being aware that there is another choice.  And I seem powerless to make that other choice.

     

    I don't want to make this new phase of Independence one that I look back on and remember my weight problems.  I want to look back at it and say -- hey, I started getting out of my apartment more then!  I learned that a tablespoon of olive oil every day is actually good for me -- my diet shouldn't be totally fat-free!  My self esteem wasn't based on an arbitrary ideal!  The reality is, that is hard to do.  But I'm trying.

    • Phat in My 40's
      Health Guide
      Nov. 15, 2010

      Donna,

       

      It's very nice to meet you!!  We have much in common with weight being something that marks the transitions of life.  I spent 10 years looking the other way each time I had to weigh-in at the doctor's office.  I didn't want to know what the number said, but I knew by my clothing that I was gaining.

       

      Now, I am glad to check...

      RHMLucky777

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      Donna,

       

      It's very nice to meet you!!  We have much in common with weight being something that marks the transitions of life.  I spent 10 years looking the other way each time I had to weigh-in at the doctor's office.  I didn't want to know what the number said, but I knew by my clothing that I was gaining.

       

      Now, I am glad to check every couple of days and mark the progress.  This is a new era of finding freedom from food and realizing the gains from that.  It wasn't until I asked the nurse to check my records that I learned my highest documented weight was 283 pounds!!  Frightening. I was in such denial.

       

      I like that way you can use your documentation to confirm that you have NOT gained weight even if your mind thinks otherwise.  As I've been losing and my body is changing, it is strange that I sometimes feel even fatter because of how the flesh is soft in new places.  Cognitively I know it is not true, but emotionally it feels that way sometimes.

       

      Until last fall, I had been taking Zoloft for many years.  I don't know if that contributed to the gain over time, but it seems that Wellbutrin has not kept me from losing (which is very nice).  Isn't it frustrating sometimes how our medications which help us live better lives sometimes contribute to other problems?

       

      Hang in there with balancing the side-effects of your medications.  Resisting that urge to eat 24/7 is not easy, I know.  And trying to avoid connecting the number on the scale with personal success or failure is also difficult.

       

      Sounds wonderful that you are focusing on things like being able to get out of the house as markers of your era of Independence.  Very nice!!  Focus on the things you can do for yourself no matter how small or how difficult.  Good for you!!