Pouch Rules and the Gastric Bypass Patient - My Bariatric Life

My Bariatric Life Health Guide
  • I like rules for other people. I am comfortable knowing that others are living by standards that will carry across and benefit everyone. I do not disparage their personal successes either. Benefits had from honest efforts are deserved, and those who achieve through personal discipline should be given some degree of respect to say the least. I admire those who can map a route to success and stay the course.

    On the other hand, what I enjoy for myself are results. Rules are a hazard. Rules are difficult. I prefer the magic wand approach where a sweep of a shiny stick and a sprinkle of some mysterious dust gets me what I want. Results without rules, that’s what I’m talking about. The undisciplined, no effort needed, get me there fast, this wasn’t hard at all, take a victory lap standard for accomplishment.

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    Sorry. There is no such thing.

    Now that reality has been re-established, where were we? Oh yes, rules. If you wish to lose weight and keep it off, you’ll be needing some rules.

    The Gastric Bypass Pouch

    Patients will not be troubled too much by hunger in the first six months after surgery. As the pouch increases in size, feelings of hunger will present.

    Doctors have discovered that the pouch will stretch and grow for as long as two yeas after weight loss surgery. It has also been discovered that there is no discernable difference in the percentage of weight lost among patients regardless of the size of the pouch.

    When the familiar feeling of hunger returns after the first six months, simple alterations in eating habits can not only maintain weight loss but can actually promote additional reduction.

    Such alterations are founded from facts and observations that have been collected.

    It has been determined that hunger quickly returns after eating soft foods, soups, and liquids that are high in calories but solid foods that remain in the
    pouch longer extend the sensation of feeling full.

    Meals that are longer than thirty minutes undermine the purpose of the pouch because more food can be ingested. It has also been shown that drinking within 30 minutes of a meal will wash out the pouch and hunger will return.

    The Pouch Rules

    If you follow a few simple regulations, maintaining weight loss will become a more manageable chore.

    Feeling full between meals helps maintain weight loss. If meals are no longer than five hours apart, excessive hunger and snacking can be avoided.
    Too much time between meals results in overeating.

    The frequent eating of meals that are larger than one cup will promote weight gain. The ideal meal consists of finely cut meat and vegetables that are raw or cooked lightly.

    Eating too slowly prevents the pouch from expanding enough to cause a feeling of being full. Eating heavier foods in the first year after bariatric surgery increases the time that you are going to feel full. Meals should be eaten within 15 minutes.

    Do not drink liquids for 30 minutes before or after a meal. Water can be had outside of that period and will help to sate hunger.

    Water loading, or drinking as much water as you can in an appropriate timeline prior to having a meal, is another effective practice.


  • References:

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    Provost Bariatrics http://www.provostbariatrics.com/success-after-weight-loss-surgery/gastric-bypass-7-rules-for-managing-your-pouch/ - accessed on 5/26/12
    WLS Journey http://wlsjourney.org/community-forums/gastric-bypass-forums/post-op-gastric-bypass/162-gastric-bypass-pouch-rules.html -
    accessed 5/26/12

     

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    My Story...
    You can read about my decision to have weight loss surgery back in 2003 and my journey to maintain a lifetime of obesity disease management since that time. My wish is to help you on your own journey of lifetime obesity disease management with shareposts along the way to help you navigate that journey successfully.

     

     
Published On: May 26, 2012