Scientists Experiment with Food Designed to Make You Fuller Faster

The HealthGal Health Guide
  • Here's a new one - want to lose weight? Try eating!!Scientists are now experimenting with foods that trick the body into feeling that it's full.  The research is taking place in England and the concept is to create (re-tool) foods that slow the digestive process down so that signals are sent to the brain and "fullness is perceived."  We already know that so many people rush eating and never give the "fullness principle" a chance.  This takes the concept to a whole new level with foods actually doing the trick.

     

    There's actually a host of ongoing research into helping people who struggle with obesity.  Here in the US scientists are working on controlling appetite through chemical injections and implantable devices.  The research in England, that is working on re-tooling food, hinges on the body's response to fat. Fat initially gets broken down in the small intestine; the body then digests most of it in the large intestine (much further down the tract) and that's when you really feel full (brain receives the message).  So if the scientists can recreate that feeling by modifying food, so that the fullness signal is perceived much earlier - they'll have you full long before you eat too much food.

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    Another research project in the works involves seaweed that seems to help prevent absorption of fat.  They've already tested this "alginate" (seaweed derived) ingredient by adding it to bread.  Most taste testers liked the bread which works somewhat like Orlistat (you don't absorb the fat - most of it passes through your digestive tract and is expelled).  And Unilever is working on adding hoodia, a plant derivative that seems to cut hunger, to a variety of food products.

     

    In the meantime - watch calories, eat a balanced diet, use foods that have fiber and water content to fill you up and add some daily exercise.

Published On: October 25, 2008