Sunday, December 21, 2014

Trochanteric Bursitis of the Hip

A Patient's Guide to Trochanteric Bursitis of the Hip

Introduction

A common spot for bursitis is on the side of the hip. Here a large tendon passes over the bony bump on the side of the hip. The bony bump is called the greater trochanter. Inflammation in the bursa between the tendon and the greater trochanter is called trochanteric bursitis. This problem is common in older individuals. It may also occur in younger patients who are extremely active in exercises such as walking, running, or biking.

  • how trochanteric bursitis develops
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what treatments are available

Anatomy

Where is the trochanteric bursa, and what does it do?

The hip joint is one of the true ball-and-socket joints of the body. The hip socket is called the acetabulum and forms a deep cup that surrounds the ball of the upper thigh bone (femur), or femoral head. Thick muscles of the buttock at the back and the thick muscles of the thigh in the front surround the hip.

The greater trochanter is the large bump on the outside of the upper end of the femur. This bump is the point where the large buttock muscles that move the hip connect to the femur. The gluteus maximus is the largest of these muscles. It attaches lower down on the femur.

Where friction occurs between muscles, tendons, and bones, there is usually a structure called a bursa. A bursa is a thin sac of tissue that contains fluid to lubricate the area and reduce friction. The bursa is a normal structure. The body will even produce a bursa in response to friction.

To read this guide in its entirety, please continue to eOrthopod.com: Trochanteric Bursitis of the Hip

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This is an excerpt from eOrthopod.com, a website providing patients with clear, accurate and understandable information about their orthopedic and musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. eOrthopod.com includes a comprehensive library of multimedia web topics, news articles and FAQ database on musculoskeletal health. eOrthopod.com also hosts eOrthopodTV, in depth video interviews with practicing clinicians about the evaluation and treatment of common conditions and injuries of the muscles, bones and joints. For more information, visit eOrthopod.com.