Back to School Tips for Strong Bones

Pam Flores @phflores Health Guide
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    Good healthy bones, start when you are in your mother’s womb.  For this reason, women are told to get plenty of green veggies, high in calcium content, dairy foods and fortified juices/foods and vitamin D to compensate for the mothers nutritional needs and those of her growing child.  You’ve probably heard stories, from mothers, where she lost plenty of calcium during pregnancy, and for this reason, needed to take more to nourish her skeleton and those of her baby.

     

    What many don’t realize is osteoporosis can occur in fetuses.  It’s not all that uncommon for a baby to be very low in vitamin D which can cause fractures during birth, which leads health professionals and well-meaning social workers into believing there is some sort of physical abuse happening when there isn’t. 

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    You start your bone formative years when you’re in your mother’s womb; it begins during the second trimester, of your life, and continues to the age of 19, and completes this construction phase till the age of 30. It’s important to give your body the right type of nourishment to produce strong healthy bones that will hopefully prevent future bone loss when you are older and carry you through life with a healthy framework, the foundation for your body.

     

    Follow these simple recommendations, as soon as you can, and your body will thank you for it by protecting you from some fractures that can happen in babies, children, pre-teens, teens and ages beyond.

     

    Children and teens requirements for Calcium from the National Institute of Health


    0–6 months

    200 milligrams (male & female)

    7–12 months

    260 mgs

    1–3 years

    700 mgs

    4–8 years

    1,000 mgs

    9-18 years

    1,300 mgs

    Pregnant and breastfeeding

    1,300 mgs

     

    Children and teens requirements for Vitamin D from the National Institute of Health

     

    Birth to 12 months

    400 International Units (IU)

    1-13 years

    600 IU’s

    14-18 years

    600 IU’s

    19-70 years

    600 IU’s

    Pregnant and breastfeeding

    600 IU’s

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Weight bearing exercise is also a very important factor to have strong bones while they are in production; before the age of 19.

     

    Here’s a list of Weight Bearing Exercises good for your bones and oh so fun too, from the National Osteoporosis Foundation. 

     

    Dancing

    High-impact aerobics

    Hiking

    Jogging/running

    Jumping rope

    Stair climbing

    Tennis

     

    If parents can encourage their children to start early, building strong bones, we may be able to prevent many occurrences of osteoporosis when our children and grandchildren are older and more susceptible to bone loss.  Most forms of osteoporosis occur after menopause in women, or with men—at any age—are low in sex hormones or have other bone robbing medical disorders.  Also, the secondary medical causes of bone loss and medication causes of bone loss, are major causes of osteoporosis and by starting early with a healthy calcium and D rich diet and plenty of that good old weight bearing exercise, we all love to do, we can help to prevent many occurrences of bone loss and fractures.

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    At HealthCentral-Remedy Health Media we’ve interviewed members with Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis, Men with Transient Migratory Osteoporosis and the Pre-Teen Ambassador for the National Osteoporosis Foundation which will give you a good idea how this disorder can strike the very young, and what we need to do to prevent this.  Osteoporosis is not limited to the elderly or just women, young men can have Osteoporosis or Transient Migratory Osteoporosis at very young ages.  Children, teens, young/older men, babies and young adults can have bone loss too! 

     

    One of our biggest problems, that cause fragility fractures and osteoporosis, are eating disorders that cause a malabsorption of nutrient-rich minerals and vitamins; so do whatever you can to resist trying to be pencil thin just to fit in with the crowd, it causes great damage to your bones and many other organs in your body, so be bone-smart and start early providing your bones a good healthy home to thrive and grow in.

     

    Best Bones Forever® is a great resource, for the younger crowd, to educate them on bone loss and its prevention.  Please check out, BBF, and see all the great features it has for our children, teens and their parents.

     

    More Back to School Articles from Health Central.

     

    Sources:

     

    1.  National Osteoporosis Foundation (2012, August 27).

    When Kids Get Osteoporosis. Washington, DC: National Osteoporosis Foundation.

    Retrieved August 27, 2012 from the World Wide Web:   http://www.nof.org/aboutosteoporosis/detectingosteoporosis/inkids

     

     

    2. National Osteoporosis Foundation (2012, August 27).

    Vitamin D and Bone Health.  Washington, DC:  National Osteoporosis Foundation.

    Retrieved August 27, 2012 from the World Wide Web:

    http://www.nof.org/aboutosteoporosis/prevention/vitamind

     

     

    3.  National Osteoporosis Foundation (2012, August 27).

    Calcium: What You Should Know. Washington, DC: National Osteoporosis Foundation. Retrieved August 27, 2012 from the World Wide Web:

    http://www.nof.org/aboutosteoporosis/prevention/calcium

     

     

    4.  Office on Women’s Health (2012, August 27).

    Best Bones Forever®.  Washington, DC.

    Retrieved August 27, 2012 from the World Wide Web:

    http://www.bestbonesforever.gov/

     

     

    5.  National Institute of Health (2012, August 4).

    Office of Dietary Supplements: Vitamin D. Washington, DC: National Institute of Health. Retrieved August 27, 2012 from the World Wide Web:

    http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-QuickFacts/

     

     

    6.  National Institute of Health (2012, August 4).

    Office of Dietary Supplements: Factsheet Calcium.  Washington, DC:  National Institute of Health. Retrieved August 28, 2012 from the World Wide Web:

    http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Calcium-HealthProfessional/

     

     

     

     

     

Published On: August 28, 2012