Thursday, April 24, 2014

Blood in the semen

Table of Contents

Alternative Names

Semen - bloody; Blood in ejaculation


Home Care

Minor injuries may be treated with rest, applying ice, and monitoring symptoms. Major injuries may require reconstructive surgery.

Infections can often be treated with antibiotics taken by mouth (or intravenous antibiotics if symptoms are severe).

Blockages of the urinary tract system are typically treated with surgery. If cancerous tumors are the source of obstruction, radiation or chemotherapy may also be indicated.


Call your health care provider if

Always call your doctor if you notice any blood in semen.


What to expect at your health care provider's office

The health care provider will perform a physical examination, and will look for fever, swollen lymph nodes, a swollen or tender scrotum, discharge from the urethra, or an enlarged or tender prostate.

To help diagnose the cause of the problem, your health care provider will ask medical history questions, such as:

  • How much blood was in the semen?
  • Was microscopic blood ever noticed in the past when the semen was examined for another reason?
  • When did you first notice this problem? Is it present all the time?
  • Is there anything that seems to have caused this symptom?
  • What other symptoms do you have?

Tests that may be done include:

  • Prostate exam
  • PSA blood test
  • Urinalysis
  • Urine culture
  • Semen analysis
  • Semen culture
  • Ultrasound of pelvis and scrotum


Review Date: 09/30/2009
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Scott Miller, MD, Urologist in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org)