helpful tools and devices

Using Technology to Improve Your Quality of Life: Apps for Arthritis and Chronic Pain

Lene Andersen Health Guide September 25, 2012
  • One of the most frustrating aspects of living with RA and chronic pain is the unpredictable nature of these conditions. Keeping track of your symptoms, activities, triggers and treatment can help you identify patterns. Knowing what makes your symptoms worse or better is important when you live with a...

5 Comments
  • Carrie Beth Brown
    Health Guide
    Sep. 25, 2012
    I actually have been looking for ways to track symptoms and pain for a while and have found nothing that works the way I want/need it too. I was excited when both these apps came out. Track and React was first and it has a great interface but no way to export or print your data which is so something I think is helpful for taking to a docs office. I've been...
    RHMLucky777
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    I actually have been looking for ways to track symptoms and pain for a while and have found nothing that works the way I want/need it too. I was excited when both these apps came out. Track and React was first and it has a great interface but no way to export or print your data which is so something I think is helpful for taking to a docs office. I've been much more impressed with the WebMD app. It no only allows you to customize and configure your own triggers, symptoms and meds, it also allows you to print 7 or 30 days worth of data. It doesn't go as far as to print all the data for each day, which I would really like and app to do (kind of like and electronic diary that's printable) but it does give you an overall look at your pain scores, bad days, highest triggers, most common symptoms, etc. And you can track multiple times per day which I can't remember if the Track and React allowed. So far the WebMD Pain Coach does the most for me and my needs but Track and React could add in a simple print feature that would help patients more. I've been using Pain Coach for about a week now and still entering data. It does have a lot of good tips and info in it too. It gets a thumbs up from me so far. :)
    • Lene  Andersen
      Health Guide
      Oct. 01, 2012

      it's great to hear every time somebody who's used it and, it sounds like, will continue to use it. Thanks so much for your comment!

  • V
    V
    Health Guide
    Sep. 26, 2012

    Hi, Lene!

     

    I had no idea such an app existed.  I have an old-fashioned cell phone. Doesn't even take a picture! LOL  So.....I have a hardbound journal that stays on my coffee table with a gel pen that writes easily.  I write things in it all the time.  When I am flaring, when I'm not.  When I inject my Orencia, when I take my...

    RHMLucky777

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    Hi, Lene!

     

    I had no idea such an app existed.  I have an old-fashioned cell phone. Doesn't even take a picture! LOL  So.....I have a hardbound journal that stays on my coffee table with a gel pen that writes easily.  I write things in it all the time.  When I am flaring, when I'm not.  When I inject my Orencia, when I take my MTX, etc.  One of the things I have them most trouble with is keeping track of my medications.  I take tweleve prescription pain meds, and it is easy to get confused.  At least it is for me.  I definitely don't want to take too much of them, or too little for that matter.  My journal helps me keep all that straight. Thanks for enlightening me about the new apps.  Maybe one day I will have a "fancy phone".  I think it is a great tool for people who have that kind of technology available.  But even if you don't have a way to use that particular app, a journal will work, too.

     

    V

    • Carrie Beth Brown
      Health Guide
      Oct. 01, 2012
      I use the apps on my Ipad... I don't have a fancy phone either but I love my iPad. I know they make software out there for computers to track pain too. Some are free, some cost money. I used to use Excel/Open Office to keep a diary for myself of pain, fatigue, joint activity and stiffness levels. I could then take the data and create graphs to take to the doctor...
      RHMLucky777
      Read More
      I use the apps on my Ipad... I don't have a fancy phone either but I love my iPad. I know they make software out there for computers to track pain too. Some are free, some cost money. I used to use Excel/Open Office to keep a diary for myself of pain, fatigue, joint activity and stiffness levels. I could then take the data and create graphs to take to the doctor to evaluate medications and how they were working for me.
    • Lene  Andersen
      Health Guide
      Oct. 01, 2012

      I don't have a smart phone, either. I have had a severe hankering for an iPhone for a long time, but really only because of the camera and all the photo editing apps. It's a lot of money to spend to mess around with photos in a way that would probably end up hurting me, anyway. So, no smart phone for me. Wink

       

      Maybe for your iPad, though?