Saturday, October 25, 2014

Tuesday, January 12, 2010 jill, Community Member, asks

Q: should I go into assisted living. ?

I am 60,  live  alone &  have  ra  for  10 yrs. throughout   my  whole body. I  work  full  time   in  sales  where I get  up  &  down  alot. But in  the mornings  it  is  grueling to  get  dress  for work, I  find  I  only have  strength  to  shower on  week-ends and  cannot  stand long  enough  to cook  myself  an  egg. BUt  now  I  cannot  get  off   my  raised toilet  seat  or  double, stacked  cushioned  sofa without  using  a  table  and  a  towel  bar.  No  matter  what  could be  installed,  I  am  not  going  to have  the  strenth to  pull  myself  up much  longer.  and  I  have  no  friends  or  relatives  near  by. Currently,  I'm  taking  embrel, methotrexate, plaqunil,predisone, & voltaren.

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Answers (1)
Lene Andersen, Health Guide
1/13/10 10:36am

I'm so sorry you're having such a rough time - RA can be really hard on you and it's not fun when it starts affecting your ability to live alone. 

 

I think your first step should be speaking to your rheumatologist about your experiences, including being very honest about how much your RA is currently impacting your ability to live independently. it sounds to me as if your medication is not adequately suppressing your RA so you and your doctor may need to explore other treatment options.  As well, your doctor can give you a referral to a physical therapist and an occupational therapist who may be able to help you with techniques and aids for daily living that may enable you to continue living on your own (e.g., you can get chairs that can raise you from a sitting to an almost standing position, making it easier to get up, there are a number of dressing aids that can make that process easier for you and you may want to consider using a stool in the kitchen so you can cook while sitting).  Physical and occupational therapists are experts in helping people live well independently, so it's quite possible that they would have a bunch of suggestions for you. As well, your doctor or especially the occupational and physical therapists would know about resources in the community that can come in to help you, such as home care that may be able to come into your home a couple of times a week to help you shower, do some light meal prep or housekeeping, etc. As well, they would also know about assisted living. However given that you are still capable of working full-time, I think your needs may be met by connecting with various community agencies who provide services for people in your situation.

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jill, Community Member
1/13/10 11:00am

      This  was  really  helpful.  I  think  I  first  need  to  sit  with  my docto  &  have  a  serious  talk.   Thank  you  for  your  time.

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Lene Andersen, Health Guide
1/13/10 11:18am

Glad I could help.  let us know how it goes, please?

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By jill, Community Member— Last Modified: 12/10/13, First Published: 01/12/10