Why Do You Want to Word? - Economic Goals - Tradeoffs

Robin Cunningham Health Guide
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    This week we are going to look at the data we entered into our form last week and see if we can draw any conclusions concerning what we ought to set as Economic Goals when looking for work, i.e. what do we consider to be the most important and realistic economic benefits we can expect a good job to provide.  Keep in mind that the data entered is "fictitious", i.e., the basic information you might enter into the form is likely to be different and, as such, the conclusions reached in your situation might be different.  [You will note that I have reformatted our form (to make it easier to use) and changed some of the data entries (to better make some points about how to use the form)] Remember, at this juncture, we are addressing the economic implications of the following question, which is the first in a series of questions we are going consider involving employment.

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    Question #1 - Why do you want to work?

     

    Earlier blogs in this series on employment, which you may find helpful to review, include the following:

     

    "Finding and Keeping a Job" posted on 13 July 2008.

    "The 800 Pound Gorilla" posted on 20/21 July 2008

    "Finding a Job - Critical Answers" posted on 27 July 2008.

    "Finding a Job - Why Do You Want to Work?" posted on 5 August 2008.

    Why Do You Want to Work? - Economic Goals posted on 12 August 2008.

     

    Look at our newly revised form below.  You will find I've added two columns.  These are for the purpose of analyzing the data we entered and drawing some conclusions.  The analysis and discussion follow.

     

    Finding and Keeping a Good Job

       
             

    Question #1

    Why Do You Want to Work?

     

    Goals:

    Economic Goals

       
           

    MOST

           

    REASONABLE

    ECONOMIC GOALS

    IMPORTANCE

    DIFFICULTY

    GOAL          VALUE

    GOALS

     

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    --------------

    -------------

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    Financial Indepence

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Better Housing

    8

    6

    2

    2

    Pay for Medications

    10

    7

    3

    3

    Cover All Medical Expenses

    6

    9

    -3

    0

    Cover All Living Expenses

    2

    6

    -4

    0

    Supplement SSI/SSDI Income

    8

    5

    3

    3

    Do More of What I Want

    3

    3

    0

    0

    Buy More of What I Want

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Support Your Family

    7

    10

    -3

    0

    Other: Save for Retirement

    8

    10

    -2

    0

     

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    -------------

    -------------

    Totals

    52

    56

    -4

    8

     

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    ANALYSIS:

     

    You will recall that the first data we entered was in the IMPORTANCE column and indicates the importance of each goal in our own mind at the present point in our journey of recovery.  A "0" indicates the goal is of no importance to us, a "1" indicates that it is of minor importance, and "10" is to signify that it was of the greatest importance.

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    Next we entered data in the DIFFICULTY column that reflects how difficult we believed it will be for us to realize each goal at this point in our journey of recovery.  The same numbering system from "0" to "10" is used.

     

    We now have a third column entitled "GOAL VALUE.  The number in this column for each goal equals the value we entered in the IMPORTANCE column minus the value we entered in the DIFFICULTY column.  If the number in this third column is negative, it indicates that the effort involved in achieving the goal is greater than the benefit to be realized by obtaining that goal, i.e. at this point in our recovery, reaching the goal is not worth the effort.

     

    If the number in the GOAL VALUE column is positive, it means that achieving the goal is more than worth the effort required, i.e., realizing the goal will add value to our life.  The bigger the number in the GOAL VALUE column, the more realizing the goal will contribute to our quality of life.

     

    The last column entitled MOST REASONABLE GOALS, simply lists all the goals that will provide value added to our life.  You'll see in the chart that, for our hypothetical consumer, the most beneficial goals forhis/her to pursue at this point in his/her recovery are:

                    Better Housing

     

                    Pay for Medications

     

                    Supplement SSI/SSDI Income

     

    The totals provide a measure of the overall balance of in our set of goal and the difficulty of obtaining them.

     

    In closing it is important to point out that the results of the evaluation of goals in the chart above are based on our own perceptions at the time we do the evaluation and that these perceptions may change over time for many reasons, not the least of which is where we are at the time in our journey of recovery.  Our goals may change, as well as what we perceive to be the importance and difficulty of achieving these.  If this analysis of goals is to further our recovery, we must repeat the exercise periodically, especially when there has been a significant change in our circumstances, such as the realization of one or more of our goals.  Using this technique we can actually keep track over time of our changing perceptions of our own recovery.

     

    It is also important to remember that different individuals will have different goals and different perceptions of the importance and difficulty of achieving these.  Because of this, the process above is very flexible and becomes a highly personal.

    This approach to measuring our interests in seeking work and our prospects for achieving our goals from that work is itself a work in progress. There is much more to come.   If you have any ideas about how to improve this project, please send these suggestions to me in a comment on this blog or e-mail these to me at robin.cunningham1@gmail.com.

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    Please remember, this writing reflects my own experience and opinions.  If you, or a loved one, are experiencing the symptoms of schizophrenia, or any other mental illness, you should seek professional assistance.

Published On: August 17, 2008