Schizophrenia News: July 2012

  • UPDATED

     

    This just in after I posted the prior information:

     

    Four years ago, scientists at the Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute found out exactly why drugs like Zyprexa cause weight gain: it has an effect on the histaminergic system which regulates appetite.

     

    Associate Professor Chao Deng and his team tested a drug called betahistine, used mostly for vestibular disorders like vertigo and dizziness, and found that when taken with olazapinem there's a great decrease in appetite.

     

    According to Chao Deng, not only do the atypicals stimulate appetite: they change the way the body metabolizes food.

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    The team is interested in getting drug companies to do research on using betahistine to improve further treatment.

     

    (Breathrough to reduce antipsychotic drug-induced obesity, retrieved on 7/16/12 from http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/. . .)

     

    Now the original news:

     

    An Eli Lily schizophrenia drug expected to replace their drug Zyprexa that causes monster weight gain has bombed out in its late-stage clinical trial.  The experimental SZ drug known as mGlu2/3 simply did not work to treat the symptoms of this illness.  It is also known as pomaglumetad methionil.  Eli Lily awaits the results of a mid-stage study examining the drug as a combination treatment with existing atypical antipsychotics.

     

    (Eli Lily schizophrenia drug fails late-stage trial, Reuters, retrieved on July 15, 2012 from http://www.reuters.com/article. . .)

     

    NuPathe Inc. has been issued a Notice of Allowance by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for a rod-shaped implant that would deliver therapeutic levels of risperidone for 20 to 190 days as well as for treating medication noncompliance in illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar. 

     

    The currently available depot injections or long-acting injectable versions of the drugs (LAIs) are effective only for two weeks or one month.  The three-month drug therapy could hold promise for ease of use for individuals who discontinue their medication repeatedly.

     

    (NuPathe Announces Allowance of Additional U.s. Patent Application for NP202, retrieved on July 15, 2012 from http://www.marketwatch.com/story. . .)

     

    In other news: The results of a study published online in the Archives of General Psychiatry reveal a higher risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children whose parents or siblings have schizophrenia or bipolar.  Medical geneticists from North Carolina's School of Medicine University conducted a case-control study with data obtained from population registers in Sweden and Israel.

     

    In Stockholm and the entire country of Sweden, the risk of ASD was nearly three times higher in those whose parents suffered from schizophrenia.  Those whose siblings had schizophrenia had a 2.5-times higher risk of autism in Sweden and a 12-times higher risk in a sample of Israeli military personnel.

     

    The linked pattern for bipolar disorder was similar but of a lesser magnitude.

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    (Autism risk higher when parents have schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, retrieved on July 15, 2012 from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles. . .)

     

    The last significant news is that early birth could pose a higher risk for schizophrenia.  A review of birth and hospital admissions records of more than 1.3 million Swedes born from 1973 to 1985 found that young adults born at less than 32 weeks' gestation were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for schizophrenia or delusional disorders.  They were three times as likely to be hospitalized for depression and more than seven times as likely for bipolar illness.

     

    Premature birth does not inevitably lead to mental illness though as the risk found is still low in an absolute sense, according to Catherine Monk, an expert not involved in the study.

     

    Yet it is thought the study offers strong evidence for a causative relationship rather than merely an association.  It was published online last month in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

     

    (Early birth may pose higher risk to the mind, retrieved on July 10, 2012 from hyttp://www.nytimes.com/. . .)

     

    This last news account interests me the most as I was born premature at eight months.  My mother miscarried and her other fetuses did not survive.  I would be interested in hearing from community members as to whether any of you were born premature.

     

    The next SharePost will talk about the ins and outs of a 72-hour hold and other ways to increase the likelihood of getting a person with schizophrenia who is ill to be admitted to a hospital.

Published On: July 15, 2012