Life Expectancy

caregirl Community Member June 02, 2007
  • Hello everyone,

     

    My beloved sister who is now 52 years old has been a Schisophrenic since the age of 25 years old.

    She is a functioning woman now who is still on aid, she does housework for the landlady she has and goes to therapy group at least once or twice a month.  She is the sweetest, caring and loving person in the world!  My brother and I love her so very much!

     

    She worries about things and has an extremly low self esteem, even though she is a beautiful woman and because of this many times if a person looks at her or if she even hears other people talking negatively, she right away thinks they are calling her ugly and more.

     

    Also she has high blood pressure that she controls by pills, she has been taking these since a year or so ago.  She has  been taking pills for her illness for since the age of 25 years old. 

     

    I came across an article the other day in the obituaries about a young 55 year old Scheszophrenic man , who seemed to have lived his life actively, but died so young!

     

    I so worry about my sister, what is the life expentancy for a Schezophrenic, I want to learn as much as I can about my sister.

     

    By the way, my brother and myself have been there for my sister since the day she had the breakdown.  You see we were the ones who had to take into the hospital for psychiatric treatment, thank God she did sign a form too at the time to admit herself.

    The reason why we did was our own Mother was Schezophrenic and our Father, was weak and emotional about our sister, so we had to be the strong ones.

     

    My sister was the youngest and I was the middle child and my brother the older child, now all in our fifties.

     

    Please anyone answer my question and any suggestions, comments you may have for us.

     

    Sincerely

    Caregirl

     

     

14 Comments
  • Christina Bruni
    Health Guide
    Jun. 05, 2007

    Caregirl, Janet is right: the object is for your mother to live her life to the fullest.


    She seems to be doing well for the most part, and that's the ultimate goal: to stay out of the hospital.


    So continue to be there for her and give her your support, encouragement and praise.


    Some people could be miserable and live to be 90, others could be happy and die...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Caregirl, Janet is right: the object is for your mother to live her life to the fullest.


    She seems to be doing well for the most part, and that's the ultimate goal: to stay out of the hospital.


    So continue to be there for her and give her your support, encouragement and praise.


    Some people could be miserable and live to be 90, others could be happy and die young.


    I suspect, though, longevity is determined by each person's capacity for joy, sense of humor, and her vitality, that is, is she "young at heart."


    Worry less, enjoy your sister while she's here. You are one of the reasons she's doing so well, so pat yourself on the back and take it easy.


    Cheers,

    cb

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Jun. 07, 2007

      Hi CB,


      Thank you so much for your input and you are so right, worry less and just enjoy the time I have with my Sister.


      My Sister and I have always been young at heart and good caring people. So I guess we should focus on enjoying ourselves and helping others too.


      Thank you!


      God Bless.

      Susan

  • Anonymous
    lisa dunlavey
    Mar. 20, 2009

    I have a 16 year, 10 month, old son that is believed to be schizophrenic. He sees people and hears voices. This has been going on for a few years on and off. But has now become much worse. He also had/has anorexia/bulimia. He was recently assessed by a psychologist that found his symptoms consistent with major depressive disorder, schizoaffective disorder,...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    I have a 16 year, 10 month, old son that is believed to be schizophrenic. He sees people and hears voices. This has been going on for a few years on and off. But has now become much worse. He also had/has anorexia/bulimia. He was recently assessed by a psychologist that found his symptoms consistent with major depressive disorder, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and personality disorder. He was hospitalized for anorexia two times and recently for substance abuse. My son use to be on zyprexa but is not willing to take any prescribed drug for fear that it will make him put on weight. He believes smoking marajuana helps him. When he uses pot he does not see any hallucinations and feels much better. All my research suggests that marajulisi makes schizophrenia worse or might actually cause schizophrenia. My son would like to have medical marajuana prescribed for him. That is something I can't even imagine possible. My son's overall I.Q. was also found to be 137. Is he just manipulating the system to get what he enjoys or does pot really remove the symptoms of schizophrenia that torment him?

    • Anonymous
      Joan
      Apr. 15, 2009

      Hello.  I have a 55-year-old son, Steven, who was diagnosed with schizophrenia very late in life, he did not have his major breakdown until he was 33.  Before his breakdown, he had problems in school, interacting with people, staying up all night and sleeping all day (I think this is because he was afraid of the dark and still is).  Of course,...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Hello.  I have a 55-year-old son, Steven, who was diagnosed with schizophrenia very late in life, he did not have his major breakdown until he was 33.  Before his breakdown, he had problems in school, interacting with people, staying up all night and sleeping all day (I think this is because he was afraid of the dark and still is).  Of course, this caused many problems in the family (I have three other children).  He dropped out of high school in the 9th grade. He could never keep a job.  He has an IQ of 141.  He taught himself to play the piano, learning theory, everything, and plays anything and everything he wants to, including the classics.  He also taught himself Spanish because he has a "fettish" with the Mayans and has been to Mexico several times.  He knew a man who was a barber and owned his own shop; Steven thought he could do well as a barber.  His friend attested to the state barber commission that Steven had worked under him as a barber apprentice for 18 months to enable Steven to take the state barber test w/o going to barber school.  Steven "aced" the test and became a master barber (he was 21).  But, he still could not hold a job for more than 2-3 months at a time until, finally, he could not work at all.  He also became interested in kayaking - researched it and became a master kayaker until a few years ago and it became too physically exhausting so he had to discontinue it.  At his breakdown, he was hospitalized and put on MANY medications (and was even overmedicated at one point).  There are not many psychiatrists (in my experience) that are worthy of being called a physician (he has had too many to enumerate).  I have always searched for Christian psychiatrists.  Over these many years, he also was drinking alcohol and smoking pot with his medication; he also smokes cigarettes since age 13.  He sees hallucinations and hears voices.  He also tried different illegal drugs in his teens (I don't know if any of these had anything to do with his illness - we have no other illness of this type in our family).  He is a "loner" and has always been.  I am the only one he has any close contact with.  He doesn't really communicate with his siblings; he talks to them briefly at holidays only.  He used to be very close to the youngest son but after smoking "pot" and drinking together and getting into a fight a few years ago, they are no longer "close" brothers.  He has always been of very slim stature, and has never been put on any meds that caused weight gain (but then his doctors have never put him on Zyprexia).   He has been stabilized on Risperdal (check spelling) medication (3 mg - one time/day) for many years now and his personality is always very calm.  He quit drinking alcohol and smoking "pot" about five years ago because (he finally admitted) it made him feel too bad mixing with the medication.  The only other med he takes is to lower his cholesterol.  His blood pressure is GREAT (120/80).  All his lab work is good.  He still stays awake all night and sleeps all day.  He still hears voices but he deals with it - he has a very strong personality and also is a Christian, so any thoughts of suicide have always been out of the question.  Anyone meeting him for the first time has no idea there is anything wrong with him, he appears very normal.  But, he has NEVER had bizarre behavior like some.  He used to be very paranoid for years after his breakdown, but now that behavior seems to have been stabilized.  I, also, am a very strong Christian and he says when he is around me, the voices he hears subside because they know I am a Christian and they don't like to be around me!  The worst problem I am having with him right now is bathing and brushing his teeth.  His only complaint is fatigue - he is always tired.  Steven is a very sweet, considerate, loving son who always thanks me for anything I do for him.  I hope all of this helps you with your son.  God bless both of you and all who are afflicted with mental illness (I pray for all of them).  Check with your doctor about Risperdal - it might help your son too.  It is the best med he has ever been on. 

    • Bradley12358
      Aug. 05, 2012
      Loved your reply message here. I have a very simliar story to your son. I have schizophrenia, and am also taking Risperdal, approximately the same dose as your son. I was hearing voices in the radio and had many paranoid delusions. I try to have a similar attitude as your son too, thanking people as much as possible for everything they do for me. I am not employed,...
      RHMLucky777
      Read More
      Loved your reply message here. I have a very simliar story to your son. I have schizophrenia, and am also taking Risperdal, approximately the same dose as your son. I was hearing voices in the radio and had many paranoid delusions. I try to have a similar attitude as your son too, thanking people as much as possible for everything they do for me. I am not employed, but if I can manage my condition well enough I think I would love to give it a try again. It's just hard remembering what I'm told to do and it's hard following directions sometimes becuase there is something wrong with metal processing that makes it difficult to process/cognate an instruction. I am not stupid, in fact have a college degree. I commend you on the way you treat your son. It is very difficult to stay positive when you watch your life fall apart from your inability to complete a 'to do list.' Time management is a nightmare for me. personal hygeine is how people notice schizophrenia, but for me it's mostly frustrating when i notice i havnt done things I know that I "should". I feel down generally, possibly a reaction to the pills, but I find that focusing on the fact that God has a plan for me and I am here to learn something; I'm here to learn something from living and suffering with schizophrenia overtaking my life. Humility. Charity. Gratitude. Patience. Discipline. These notions feel different to me now, a distortion from what they once meant to me. I was diagnosed at 29 yrs old. I've lost relationships. I've lost jobs. I've lost independence. I've lost peoples' respect. Hopefully I can find a way to gain just one thing in my life: wisdom. It would be all I want out of this torture. I hope God forgives me for calling my condition torture, but it is suffering, and I don't want to do anything but send Glory to God, somehow, someway. I'ts a long road home. HOefully your son knows that someone else out in hte world knows and cares about what it's like, so lonely and helpless and destitute and rejected. God loves his children, all of them. He is the only place I can truly turn for help, for comfort, for unconditional love, and for peace. Good luck in your endeavors my friends.
  • nagulanchi
    Sep. 03, 2008

    HI ,

     

    I am from India, i have an aunt who has been suffering from schizophernia for past 30yrs, she does have high blood pressure and sugar problem too she is doing fine now in her 60s. What i stongly feel i s that the disease has nothing to do with life expectancy , it is a disorder of the brain. The symptoms which you said are normal with all the patients...
    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    HI ,

     

    I am from India, i have an aunt who has been suffering from schizophernia for past 30yrs, she does have high blood pressure and sugar problem too she is doing fine now in her 60s. What i stongly feel i s that the disease has nothing to do with life expectancy , it is a disorder of the brain. The symptoms which you said are normal with all the patients suffering. My aunt shouts at people thinking they are commenting on her. Now she has become 75%normal has a daughter who is 20yrs old and is doing her post graduation. She is doing fine in her life. People even live upto their 80s and 90s so please start to live in the present time happily rather than worrying about life expectancy. Your sister will do very well in her life and all the best to her in her life from my side.

    • hanu
      Oct. 08, 2008
      Is there a good doctor/rehabilitation centre in Chennai? I have a brother who has this problem
  • Anonymous
    Joanne
    Feb. 11, 2008

    Hi. I am also looking for answers about this illness. My brother has Schizophrenia. I have been doing so much research on the internet my brain is overflowing. I wonder if any of you have had the loved ones in your lives tested for Celiac disease? I believe it could have something to do with causing Schizophrenia. It is a gluten allergy. Gluten is in wheat,rye...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Hi. I am also looking for answers about this illness. My brother has Schizophrenia. I have been doing so much research on the internet my brain is overflowing. I wonder if any of you have had the loved ones in your lives tested for Celiac disease? I believe it could have something to do with causing Schizophrenia. It is a gluten allergy. Gluten is in wheat,rye and barley. The gluten damages the intestine at a point where nutrients should be sent to the brain. Its a long story but google Schizophrenia and Celiac together. I'm sure my brother has the Celiac but I have not been able to get him tested. If anyone has had there loved ones or themselves tested for Celiac and they have Schizophrenia I would love to hear about it. Maybe if we can get the Celiac under control they could also have longer lifes.

  • Anonymous
    Liz
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Hi I don't have Schizophrenia, but my biological mother does or did i don't know if she is still alive or if she has died i don't know a lot about my mom's case but i want to know more and i want to know if there is any possible way to find out if she has died yet. She will be turning 53 i believe this year (or in her mid 50s) i also would like...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More
    Hi I don't have Schizophrenia, but my biological mother does or did i don't know if she is still alive or if she has died i don't know a lot about my mom's case but i want to know more and i want to know if there is any possible way to find out if she has died yet. She will be turning 53 i believe this year (or in her mid 50s) i also would like to know if there is any chance that this is passed on to me. I don't think that she knows that i was born but i'm not sure but i would really like to meet her...
  • Anonymous
    Someone
    Jul. 01, 2007
    I am suffering too and I am not with my family or someone and not even in my own country here what is happening to me i cannot explain. I got schizophrenia from the age of 18. Now I am 24. I am thinking some way to suicide how can I just thinking and thinking now I think i will try the final way i.e. treatment in this country if nothin can be done then I want...
    RHMLucky777
    Read More
    I am suffering too and I am not with my family or someone and not even in my own country here what is happening to me i cannot explain. I got schizophrenia from the age of 18. Now I am 24. I am thinking some way to suicide how can I just thinking and thinking now I think i will try the final way i.e. treatment in this country if nothin can be done then I want to quit. Previously I didn't know that what really happening to me but later on I realised that I am suffering from schizophrenia.
    • Anonymous
      Joanne
      Feb. 14, 2008
      I have been wondering how you are doing ever since I read your comment. How are you? I just want you to know someone cares!
    • nagulanchi
      Sep. 03, 2008

      Hi,

       

      My first suggestion is to you to join a government hospital as in patient in the country and stop thinking of suicide.

       

      What ever may be your condition you will become very normal in a month's time with proper medication by a good doctor.

       

      U will become normal in no time there are plenty of medications available with in your reach.

       ...

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Hi,

       

      My first suggestion is to you to join a government hospital as in patient in the country and stop thinking of suicide.

       

      What ever may be your condition you will become very normal in a month's time with proper medication by a good doctor.

       

      U will become normal in no time there are plenty of medications available with in your reach.

       

      Hope you will get well soon.

  • Janet
    Jun. 02, 2007

    Here are my thoughts about life expectancy for a person living with schizophrenia. Let me first start off by saying while I am younger than your sister I to was diagnosed at the age of 23. I now am 47.


    I am a firmer believer that when it is your time to die you will die. I do not say this to be mean or anything but that is my believe. I do believe it is in everyone's...

    RHMLucky777

    Read More

    Here are my thoughts about life expectancy for a person living with schizophrenia. Let me first start off by saying while I am younger than your sister I to was diagnosed at the age of 23. I now am 47.


    I am a firmer believer that when it is your time to die you will die. I do not say this to be mean or anything but that is my believe. I do believe it is in everyone's best interest to try to stay healthy. I am a physical active person and I would never even dream of not following my psychiatrist instructions. I have managed to get my weight of a high 188 pounds to what it is now which is 135 pounds. It has taken time and it was not easy but I did manage to do it.


    As far as worrying about how long your sister will live may I suggest try to get her to live her life to the fullest. I first would let her know that you are proud of how she is able to clean for her landlady. I only wish I could find some sorta parttime work but for now I stay busy thru volunteer work.


    I do know your concern because at times I worry about what I will do when my mom dies. My Mom and I get along so well but it is an entirely different story with my Dad. Several of my relatives have told me not to worry because and I too believe God has a plan for all of us.


    I am sorry this post is so long but I just wanted to let you know I understand and I say why worry about the unknown? Just try being there as you have been for your sister. I know she appreciates it even though she may not always tell you so.

    • Anonymous
      Anonymous
      Jun. 07, 2007

      Hi Janet,


      It was so good reading your comments, it really inspired me even more.


      I will help make my Sister's life fulfilling and continue to take her places and laugh and cry with her. She really is very special to me.

       

      I'm sure we will be talking again and maybe if my Sister will want to, I can have her write you when she comes over to my house....

      RHMLucky777

      Read More

      Hi Janet,


      It was so good reading your comments, it really inspired me even more.


      I will help make my Sister's life fulfilling and continue to take her places and laugh and cry with her. She really is very special to me.

       

      I'm sure we will be talking again and maybe if my Sister will want to, I can have her write you when she comes over to my house.

       

      Thank you and God Bless you.

       

      Susan