Rosacea

6 Facts About Rosacea

Allison Tsai Apr 2nd, 2013 (updated Feb 3rd, 2014)
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Rosacea is a long-term condition that affects the skin and, in some cases, the eyes. Although rosacea is not dangerous, it should be treated as soon as possible to improve appearance.

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Rosacea often begins with blushing or flushing
Rosacea often begins with blushing or flushing

People with rosacea will usually notice that they blush or flush more often or more easily than other people. Though the redness is usually on the face only, it can also spread to the ears, chest and back.

Source:

American Academy of Dermatology

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There are four types of rosacea
There are four types of rosacea

Because there are many signs and symptoms of rosacea, the condition has been split into four subtypes. Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea causes redness, flushing and visible blood vessels; Papulopustular rosacea can cause redness, swelling and acne breakouts; Phymatous rosacea causes the skin to thicken and become bumpy; and ocular rosacea can cause the eyes to be red, irritated, and swollen.

Source:

American Academy of Dermatology

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Rosacea can get worse if not treated
Rosacea can get worse if not treated

Over time, people with rosacea may find that they have permanent redness in the center of their face. If left untreated, rosacea can spread and become worse.

Source:

American Academy of Dermatology

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Fair-skinned women are most likely to get rosacea
Fair-skinned women are most likely to get rosacea

Though anyone can get rosacea, people between 30 and 50 years of age,  are fair-skinned or have Celtic or Scandinavian ancestry are most likely to get the condition. In addition, women are more likely than men to develop it, and your genes play a role.

Source:

American Academy of Dermatology

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Rosacea can flare
Rosacea can flare

Everyday things can trigger a rosacea flare, but they vary from person to person. Some common triggers include sunlight, stress and many foods and beverages. Dermatologists recommend learning what triggers your rosacea so you can avoid those things.

Source:

American Academy of Dermatology

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Treatment depends on the type of rosacea
Treatment depends on the type of rosacea

This is why seeing a dermatologist is so important. Once your doctor has figured out your signs and symptoms, he or she can start a treatment regimen. This can include a mix of topical medicine, sunscreen, emollients to repair the skin, laser and light treatments and antibiotics.

Source:

American Academy of Dermatology