Anti-Aging

Why You Should Dry Brush Your Skin

Allison Bush Jul 29th, 2014 (updated Oct 24th, 2016)
1 of 6
Next
1 of 6
It helps shed dead skin
It helps shed dead skin

Dry brushing will help exfoliate your skin by removing dead skin cells and unclogging pores. It also promotes new cell renewal. 

2 of 6
It helps increase circulation
It helps increase circulation

By moving around the outer layer of your skin, you're essentially "waking up" your circulatory system. This will encourage your body to eliminate metabolic waste and will allow your system to better distribute fat deposits (cellulite). 

3 of 6
It helps stimulate your lymphatic system
It helps stimulate your lymphatic system

Your lymphatic system is responsible for removing cellular waste in your body. When this system is on the fritz, waste can build-up in your body and make you sick. Dry brushing helps relieve lymphatic congestion by helping move toxins through the body. Unlike the cardiovascular system, the lymph system doesn’t rely on an automatic pumping device to keep it working.

4 of 6
It may help relieve stress
It may help relieve stress

If you make dry brushing part of your routine, you may start to find it meditative, especially if you do it in a quiet space. It may reduce muscle tension, calm your mind, and relieve stress. Many compare it to a light whole-body massage.

5 of 6
It may help support digestion
It may help support digestion

Some say dry brushing helps with bloating because massaging the lymph nodes helps the body shed excess water and toxins. 

6 of 6
How do you do it?
How do you do it?

Dry brushing is best done before showering first thing in the morning. It's also best to use a brush with natural bristles. To begin, start at the ankles and brush upward using light but firm strokes. You always want to brush toward the heart because that is the way the lymph flows naturally. After you finish your legs, brush your stomach, arms, and shoulders.