Monday, July 28, 2014

Narcolepsy - Treatment

Treatment


Lifestyle treatment of narcolepsy includes taking three or more scheduled sleep-times/naps throughout the day. Patients should also avoid heavy meals and alcohol, which can interfere with sleep.

People with mild narcolepsy symptoms who do not need medication may be able to maintain alertness with sleep scheduling. The role of scheduled naps for patients who are responding to medications for narcolepsy remains unclear.

Medications for narcolepsy target the major symptoms of sleepiness and cataplexy. Stimulant drugs are used to manage excessive daytime sleepiness while antidepressants and other compounds address cataplectic symptoms. The FDA has approved three drugs specifically for the treatment of narcolepsy. They are now the first-line treatments:

  • Modafinil (Provigil): For excessive, uncontrollable, daytime sleepiness
  • Armodafinil (Nuvigil)
  • Sodium oxybate (Xyrem): For cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness

Drug Treatments for Sleepiness

Modafinil. Modafinil (Provigil) is a drug used to treat the excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy and other sleep disorders. It has largely replaced methylphenidate (Ritalin) and other stimulants for treatment of narcolepsy sleepiness. Patients who switch to modafinil from stimulants such as methylphenidate have few problems if they gradually taper off the stimulant dose.

Modafinil helps patients with narcolepsy stay awake during the day. While only some experience normal wake times, patients taking modafinil often have up to a 50% improvement in the ability to stay awake, as well as a 25% reduction in the number of involuntary sleep episodes. It has not been proven to be safe in pregnant women. Pregnant women or those wishing to get pregnant should discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with their doctors.

Some of modafinil's additional benefits include what it does not do:


Review Date: 07/04/2010
Reviewed By: Harvey Simon, MD, Editor-in-Chief, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org)