10 Tips for Sun Safety on Spring Break

Allison Tsai | Mar 21st 2013 Apr 5th 2017

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Sun safety is important any time of year, but when spring break rolls around, more families pack up and head to sunny locations. Keep in mind these tips when you are soaking up the sun.

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Don’t go out in the midday sun

It’s best to stay indoors, or in shaded areas between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. This is when the sun is most likely to burn your skin.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Beware of white surfaces

Many surfaces can reflect the UV rays of the sun, which can cause sunburn. These surfaces include sand, concrete and snow, so, it’s important to wear sunglasses and sunscreen even if you are in the water or out skiing.

Source:

Medical News Today

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You can still get sunburned on a cloudy day

Make sure you are using at least a 15 SPF sunscreen, even if it’s cloudy.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Use broad spectrum sunscreen

This will protect your skin from both ultraviolet A rays (UVA) and ultraviolet B rays (UVB). This kind of sunscreen offers better protection for your skin.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Apply sunscreen every two hours

Also apply it immediately after swimming, and use a water-resistant or waterproof sunscreen.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Try zinc oxide

Zinc oxide can protect against sunburn and skin damage caused by UV rays, and is not absorbed into the skin. It is the broadest UVA and UVB reflector approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It can be used as extra protection for sensitive areas, such as cheeks, nose, ears and shoulders.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Apply sunscreen correctly

Make sure to get every inch of exposed skin, and pay special attention to your hands, feet, ears, nose and face.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Apply sunscreen 15 minutes before going outside

This can make sure the sunscreen has time to absorb and start working.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Don’t stay out in the sun too long

Just because you are wearing sunscreen, doesn’t mean you should sit out in the sun all day long. The purpose is to protect your skin from the damaging effects of UV rays, not to go tanning.

Source:

Medical News Today

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Avoid getting a blistering sunburn

Just one blistering sunburn can increase the risk of skin cancer.

Source:

Medical News Today