Maintaining a Positive Outlook with Ulcerative Colitis

Erica Sanderson | Aug 11th 2015 Feb 22nd 2017

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Enjoy the present moment

Don’t stress about the future and let your mind run wild with things you can’t control or what may happen.  Worry and anxiety will only weaken your immune system—and wreak havoc on your emotions. Be totally present in the moment and enjoy how things are now. By living in the moment, you can calm your mind and body and prevent life from passing you by.

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Find gratitude in the everyday

Be thankful for the little things in life: blue sky, a pretty flower, a text from a friend. Focusing on these simple yet beautiful things can ease your mind and bring some much-needed life perspective. Fostering gratitude can help promote and boost positive thinking.

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Choose your company wisely

The energy and attitude of those around you can greatly impact your mental and emotional state. Cultivate positive and supportive people in your life who keep you uplifted and will be there for you through thick and thin. Remove toxic relationships and people who only bring you down—no one has time for that, especially people with chronic illness.

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Keep updated on the latest research and information

New treatments are constantly being developed to help manage ulcerative colitis (UC). Find out what is currently being researched and the new options coming down the pipeline. If other treatments haven’t worked well in the past, that doesn’t mean future ones won’t. Maintaining hope is an important life line for anyone living with a chronic illness.

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Focus on what you can control

Sure, UC can be very unpredictable. But that doesn’t mean there is nothing you can do. Recognize how you can help manage it. Follow your treatment regimen, listen to your body, and make the right choices. All of these steps can improve your quality of life.

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Tap into the UC community

There are many support systems out there. Talk to other people living with UC to gain advice, insights and tips. Your peers may calm your nerves, soothe your concerns, and make you feel better. It’s always nice to talk to someone who truly understands what you’re going through.

NEXT: Six Treatment Options for Ulcerative Colitis
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