Drinking more coffee could lower diabetes risk

Drinking more coffee consistently could reduce risk of type 2 diabetes, according to new research.

Scientists from Harvard School of Public Health collected observational data from three large prospective studies conducted in the U.S. Collectively, the studies provided data on diet, lifestyle, medical conditions and chronic diseases among adults over the course of 20 years. Using the data, the researchers were able to analyze the effects of coffee consumption during a four-year period.

The researchers found that the participants who increased their coffee intake by on average one-and-a-half cups per day for four years reduced their risk of type 2 diabetes by 11 percent in the subsequent four years, compared to those who made no changes in coffee consumption. They also found that the participants who decreased their coffee intake by on average two cups per day increased their risk of type 2 diabetes by 17 percent. The “high-stable consumers”—people who consistently consumed three or more cups of coffee per day—had the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes, which was 37 percent lower than that of “low-stable consumers”—people who consistently consumed one cup or less per day. The results applied only to caffeinated coffee and did not apply to tea or decaf coffee.

The findings, published in the journal Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) add to previous evidence that coffee consumption habits are related to diabetes risk.

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Sourced from: Science Daily, Increasing consumption of coffee associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, study finds