Fall Risks in Older Adults Differ in Men and Women

by Diane Domina Content Production Editor

In a study of seniors over the age of 60 living in a community setting, different factors were associated with an increased risk of falling in men and women. Study results, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, indicate:

  • Factors that increase short-term fall risk in women include living alone, needing help with daily activities, and a history of falling.

  • Factors that increase short-term fall risk in men include low blood pressure, difficulty standing up from a sitting position, and a history of falling.

  • Factors that increase long-term fall risk in women include being underweight, cognitive impairment, use of certain medications (blood pressure or diabetes medicine, for example), and needing help with daily activities.

  • Factors that increase long-term fall risk in men include smoking, cardiovascular disease, impaired balance, and a history of falling.

This study was conducted by researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Falls are a serious problem for older adults and, according to the researchers, learning more about gender-related risk factors could help improve screening and prevention strategies.

Sourced from: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

Diane Domina
Meet Our Writer
Diane Domina

Diane works across brands at Remedy Health Media, producing digital content for its sites and newsletters. Prior to joining the team, she was the editorial director at HealthCommunities.