I Just Had My Gall Bladder Removed A Week Ago. It Was Only Working At 7%. The Problem Is The Surgeon Found Adhesions On My Gallbladder And Liver While He Was In There. Is This Something That Is Going

Question

Asked by Tonya

I Just Had My Gall Bladder Removed A Week Ago. It Was Only Working At 7%. The Problem Is The Surgeon Found Adhesions On My Gallbladder And Liver While He Was In There. Is This Something That Is Going

to kill me. What if it attaches to my heart or lungs?

Answer

Adhesions are bands of scar tissue that form between tissues and organs. They most frequently develop following surgery, but can sometimes result from an injury or inflammation. Adhesions are most common in the abdominal area. They usually cause no problems and go unnoticed until, like in your case, surgery for another purpose reveals them. On occasion, they may cause an intestinal obstruction and become painful. In that case, it is important to see the doctor to determine the seriousness of the obstruction.

Adhesions of the heart and lung are much less common and usually only occasionally develop following some type of inflammation. For example, following rheumatic fever or pericarditis, adhesions may form in the pericardial sac that surrounds the heart. Or they could possibly develop in the lungs after pluerisy.

I'm not a doctor, so I can't say for sure, but from what I've been able to find, it doesn't sound like abdominal adhesions spread to the heart and lungs. I think the diaphragm helps protect those organs from things like that.

Be sure to express your concerns and questions to your surgeon. He has seen your adhesions and knows your condition. He should be able to give you the best answer for your particular case.

Answered by Karen Lee Richards