My Mother Has Been Hallucinating All Night And Half A Day And She Is Still Going. Dr. Suggested More Of Her Medication. Any Suggestion On How To Deal With This Situation? Thank Youuu, Rosana

Question

Asked by rosana gonzalez

My Mother Has Been Hallucinating All Night And Half A Day And She Is Still Going. Dr. Suggested More Of Her Medication. Any Suggestion On How To Deal With This Situation? Thank Youuu, Rosana

She goes from scary visions to funny ones. In other words she gets panicky and afraid and later she laughs a lot from what she hears in her head. My friends insists I should consider a nursing home but if I can handle it, what would they do differentely than what Im doing?. Thank you!!! Rosana

Answer

Hallucinations are false impressions (hearing and/or seeing things or people that are not there, for example) and delusions are false beliefs (such as believing money has been stolen, or that a spouse is having an affair). Such symptoms are common in individuals in the middle/moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease. However, it is necessary to point out that if the hallucinations came on suddenly, it may signal some sort of medical issue, such as an infection. If this is the case, it is recommended that your mother be evaluated in person by a medical professional. Dealing with hallucinations and/or delusions can be one of the more challenging aspects of caring for an individual with Alzheimer's disease Although your mother is disconnected from reality, what she is experiencing is real to her; you will not be able to convince her of the truth. Instead of trying to change her behaviors, it might be easier to manage them. First, assess whether the hallucinations are causing your mother anxiety and/or distress. Not all hallucinations and delusions are unpleasant, so you might really address them only if your mother is upset. Otherwise, acknowledge and validate your mother's concerns, but then redirect and distract her with something more pleasant. For example, if your mother is seeing family members who have long passed, such her own mother, you might say, "Mom, I know you loved your mother so much! She was one special lady. Her apple pie was the best I ever had! Speaking of, why don't we go into the kitchen and get a slice of that cake I picked up yesterday?" Here, you are recognizing and validating your mother's concerns, but you are neither confirming nor denying her reality. By redirecting her, you are taking her mind away from what is unpleasant, and steering her towards something more positive.