Slow Walking Doubles Your Heart Disease Risk

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Slow walkers were twice as likely to die from heart disease over a six-year period as brisk walkers, according to a new study from the United Kingdom.

For the study, researchers analyzed information on more than 420,000 middle-aged adults, none of whom had heart disease or cancer at the start of the study. Participants rated their usual walking pace as "slow," "steady/average," or "brisk" and underwent an exercise test in a laboratory to evaluate their fitness levels. During the study period, nearly 8,600 of the participants died, 1,650 from heart disease.

People in the study who identified themselves as slow walkers were up to 2.4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those who identified as brisk walkers. Risk was highest in people with low body mass index (BMI), which may have indicated malnutrition or age-related muscle loss (a condition called sarcopenia). Results of the study were published in the European Heart Journal.

Sourced from: Live Science