Study finds body has two “rush hours”

Turns out our bodies may have their own rush hours.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found that genes largely increase cell and tissue activity around dawn and dusk. They believe this can help determine when it’s best to take time-sensitive medication.

In the study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers observed cells in 12 different tissues, every two hours throughout the day. Samples from the liver, kidneys, lungs brain and certain fat tissues were studied, among others. Of the tissues studied, 43percent showed daily changes in cell activity. From these findings, researchers were able to estimate that protein-controlling genes would also have rush hours in almost half of all body tissues found in the body.

Taking a medication at a time that aligns with your body clock, could have a huge impact on its effectiveness, according to the study.

Almost half of the top 100 drugs already on the market target the same genes that have increased activity during these rush hours, researchers said. They are optimistic that these findings can aid drug companies in developing future treatments.

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Sourced from: BBC News HealthResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania found that genes largely increase cell and tissue activity around dawn and dusk. They believe this can help discover when it’s best to take time-sensitive medication., Source: Body clock: ‘Rush Hour’ transformation discovered