When Mom Has a Migraine

B.S. Dietetics, Dietitian, Health Professional
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When mom has a migraine attack, it’s rough. We all know “mamas don’t get sick days”! But there are a few things you can do to prepare that will make the next migraine day a little less painful.

Prepare meals ahead

It is always helpful to have meals that you can just warm in the oven on hand. Whether they be meals you’ve made that include more food than you’ll eat at one sitting (to freeze half) or store-bought frozen meals, it really doesn’t matter much as long as it’s fast and easy. Have helpers you can call

If you are a single parent or your significant other works long hours then you may not be able to hand off your child’s pick up, drop off, soccer game, or dance class to them. That’s when it can be helpful to have people within those groups that you trust to take your children to and from their normal activities. It’s also a good idea to look into the bus schedule just in case you need your child to ride the bus home one day.

Keep your medications on hand and filled

The last thing you want to be doing when you have a migraine attack is searching for your medications or finding that you are empty and out of refills. Always make sure that you have your medications filled and a few doses, or what your physician recommends, on hand during the week. Fill your prescriptions before they are empty and keep an eye on how many refills you have left.

Find quiet activities for your kids

Save a movie your child hasn’t seen, or find a way they can play quietly for those days when your migraine Attack is at its worst but you don’t have childcare. Hopefully it will give you enough time for your medication to alleviate some of the pain. Depending on the age of your child, explain Migraine so she knows to be quiet. Sometimes kids can surprise you with how helpful they can be.

While mamas don’t get sick days, there are ways to make a migraine day a little easier. I hope these tips help you survive your next attack!

See more helpful articles:

Preventive, Abortive, and Rescue Medications - What's the Difference?

Teaching Others About Migraine - A Letter to Use

How Is Migraine Diagnosed?

Understanding the Anatomy of a Migraine