Amy Norton

Health Writer

Amy Norton has been a medical journalist since 1999. She was a staff writer and editor for Physician's Weekly and Reuters Health, and has written on health and medicine for MSNBC, The Scientist, Prevention and HealthDay. When she's not writing, she is teaching yoga.

Conditions Covered:High Cholesterol, Heart Health, Healthy Living, Atrial Fibrillation

Latest by Amy Norton

New Cholesterol Drug Can Protect High-Risk Heart Patients

Statins remain the standard of care for most people with high cholesterol levels. But for others at high risk, it is reasonable to consider a PCSK9 inhibitor.

Even Moderate Drinking Is Not Risk Free

Drinking alcohol in limted amounts has been shown to have health benefits, but even moderate drinking isn’t without risks to heart health.

Telephone CPR May Boost Cardiac Arrest Survival

When a bystander is guided through CPR by a 911 dispatcher, it may increase the odds of survival for someone in cardiac arrest.

Stress Management May Aid Heart Attack Recovery

Adding stress management to cardiac rehabilitation may bring extra benefits to people recovering from heart complications or surgery.

Risks of Sleep Apnea for Angioplasty Patients

Have you had an angioplasty? And do you have sleep apnea? Patients with well-controlled apnea fare better than those whose symptoms go untreated, a study shows.

The Best Drug Combo for Clot Prevention

A combination of low-dose aspirin and any of three drugs known as P2Y12 inhibitors can help reduce the risk of blood clots after a heart attack or angioplasty.

New Drug Options for Heart Failure

For many people with chronic heart failure, two new drugs, Entresto and Corlanor, might help cut the risk of a hospital stay and possibly prolong their lives.

New Nutrition Labels Focus on Heart Health

Nutrition Facts labels will focus on added sugars and other nutrients that affect heart health, based on a better understanding of diet and chronic conditions.

Tai Chi and Qigong Can Help Your Heart

Growing evidence shows that traditional Chinese exercise, such as tai chi and qigong, may benefit heart disease patients, both physically and mentally.

Mediterranean Diet Helps Heart Disease Patients, Too

Coronary artery disease patients who followed a Mediterranean-style diet were less likely to die prematurely or suffer a heart attack or stroke, research has found.