https://www.healthcentral.com/author/ellen-meredith-stein-m-d

Ellen Meredith Stein, M.D.

Ellen Meredith Stein, M.D., is an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. She is the current division director for informatics and the clinical director for gastroenterology and hepatology at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

Dr. Stein’s clinical and research interests include clinical applications of informatics, dysphagia (swallowing disorders), gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal motility, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, other gastrointestinal motility disorders, and pelvic floor dysfunction.

Dr. Stein received her medical degree from the George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. She completed her internship and residency in internal medicine at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. She then completed a gastroenterology fellowship at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia.

In addition, Dr. Stein worked in the motility laboratory at Albert Einstein with the esteemed Dr. Philip Katz, pursuing advanced training in esophageal motility. Dr. Stein is currently a member of the Johns Hopkins Center for Neurogastroenterology. She has a specific research focus in post-operative recovery of motility function, and she works intensively with the total pancreatectomy and autoislet cell transplant program to provide motility support to patients after their surgery.

Latest by Ellen Meredith Stein, M.D.

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Symptoms

Fixes for Fecal Incontinence

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Living With

Do You Really Need to Go Gluten-Free?

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Treatment

Proton Pump Inhibitors: How Safe Are They?

Increasing evidence suggests over time, proton pump inhibitors, used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, may not be as benign as people think.

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Tests

Is Endoscopy Safe?

In recent years, serious, sometimes deadly, infections in people who have undergone endoscopies have drawn media attention and increased scrutiny from the FDA.

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Symptoms

IBS Patients Delay Seeking Help, Survey Finds

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Treatment

Biosimilars Approved for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

The FDA has approved the first biosimilar drugs to treat inflammatory bowel diseases, such as severe Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

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Treatment

Statin Use May Protect IBD Patients

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IBD Raises Risk of Getting C. Diff Again

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Treatment

Hope for Dyspepsia With Weight Loss

If you’ve lost weight because of functional dyspepsia, or upset stomach, you might be able to gain it back by taking a certain antidepressant.

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Treatment

Surgery Versus Drugs to Treat GERD

Drugs known as proton pump inhibitors are usually the first therapy recommended to people with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Surgery is another option.