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Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H.

Medical Professional

Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor at the Erickson School of Aging of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and professor of psychiatry, part-time, and founding director of the division of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He previously held the Richman Family Chair at Johns Hopkins. He is also a member of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins.

Dr. Rabins received his medical degree from Tulane University School of Medicine and his degree in public health from Tulane University School of Public Health. He completed his residency in psychiatry at the University of Oregon.

Dr. Rabins has spent his career studying psychiatric disorders in the elderly. His current research includes identifying causes of dementia after age 85, frontotemporal lobar dementia, and autism in the elderly. Dr. Rabins has published extensively in such journals as The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), The American Journal of Psychiatry, and the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. He founded the Peter Rabins Alzheimer’s Family Support Center at Johns Hopkins to provide practical information and support for caregivers.

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