https://www.healthcentral.com/author/r-linsy-farris-m-d

R. Linsy Farris, M.D.

R. Linsy Farris, M.D., is a professor of clinical ophthalmology at Columbia University in New York City and the former director of ophthalmology at Harlem Hospital, a position he held for more than 40 years. He continues to see patients at New York Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital. He is an expert in dry eye management, a result of his National Eye Institute and Research to Prevent Blindness-sponsored research in the corneal effects of contact lens wear and tears. He is a past president of the Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists. He serves on the board of the Educational Research Fund of CLAO.

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