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Roger S. Blumenthal, M.D.

Roger S. Blumenthal, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.H.A., is the director of the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, a professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, and the inaugural Kenneth Jay Pollin Professor of Cardiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. His principal clinical and research interests involve the optimal management of ischemic heart disease, noninvasive detection of coronary atherosclerosis, and the development of new strategies to optimize the management of cardiovascular disease risk factors.

He is on the national spokesperson panel for the American Heart Association. An accomplished writer, Dr. Blumenthal has co-authored more than 500 original research articles, state-of-the-art reviews, and editorials dealing with many aspects of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis management. Dr. Blumenthal is on the editorial board of Cardiology Today, Clinical Cardiology, the American Heart Journal, and the American College of Cardiology Extended Learning Center. He is the co-editor-in-chief of the textbook Preventive Cardiology: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease and the 2015 ASPC Manual of Preventive Cardiology. He was chair of the American College of Cardiology Committee on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease for four years.

Dr. Blumenthal serves as co-chairperson of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Committee that is in charge of updating the Prevention Guidelines. The revised cholesterol management, lifestyle, and risk assessment guidelines should be completed by the start of 2017.

Latest by Roger S. Blumenthal, M.D.

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Treatment

Treatments for Heart Arrhythmia

Heart arrhythmias can be treated in different ways depending on the type of rhythm. Find out about the most common treatments.

Why Statins May Benefit Sleep Apnea Patients
Living With

Why Statins May Benefit Sleep Apnea Patients

People with sleep apnea have larger deposits of inflammatory proteins that can damage the blood vessels and lead to heart attacks.

Full fat dairy products are OK to eat on the DASH diet.
Lifestyle

Tweaking the DASH Diet Is OK

Substituting full-fat dairy products for lowfat or nonfat versions on the DASH diet does not reverse the health benefits of the diet, according to this study.

Even Moderate Drinking Is Not Risk Free
Lifestyle

Even Moderate Drinking Is Not Risk Free

Drinking alcohol in limted amounts has been shown to have health benefits, but even moderate drinking isn’t without risks to heart health.

Higher Blood Pressure Target Linked to Greater Stroke Risk
Risk Factors

Higher Blood Pressure Target Linked to Greater Stroke Risk

Research suggests that raising the target for high blood pressure treatment may increase stroke risk.

Stress Management May Aid Heart Attack Recovery
Treatment

Stress Management May Aid Heart Attack Recovery

Adding stress management to cardiac rehabilitation may bring extra benefits to people recovering from heart complications or surgery.

Risks of Sleep Apnea for Angioplasty Patients
Risk Factors

Risks of Sleep Apnea for Angioplasty Patients

Have you had an angioplasty? And do you have sleep apnea? Patients with well-controlled apnea fare better than those whose symptoms go untreated, a study shows.

Blood Test May Predict Hypertension
Tests

Blood Test May Predict Hypertension

A new blood test may be able to identify a person’s risk of developing hypertension long before the condition shows up in a blood pressure reading.

How Kidney Function Affects the Heart
Symptoms

How Kidney Function Affects the Heart

New research supports the idea that even small reductions in kidney function may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Man at doctors office getting blood pressure taken.
Lifestyle

Coronary Artery Disease: 11 Ways to Cut Your Risk

The more risk factors you have for coronary artery disease, the greater your chance of developing it. Here are 11 ways to cut your risk and help your heart.