Relationships

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Grief: The Way to Continue on Is to Work Through It

Dr. Gail Gross, Ph.D., doctor of education and nationally recognized family, child development, and human behavior expert, author, and educator talks about how to deal with the grief and massive life changes after losing a parent.

By Carol Bradley Bursack

Sex In Nursing Homes Is Still Taboo For Many

Education can help normalize the idea that sexual interaction is part of being human, and that extends to older adults, even the very old.

By Carol Bradley Bursack

How to Handle the Realization That Your Parents Are Aging

It’s a hard reality to face, but reality it is. Your parents are aging. They are on their way to “being old.”

By The Candid Caregiver

What I Wish I Knew Earlier About My Mom's Dementia

A look back provides advice on the feelings of loss, confusion, and tension associated with caring for a parent with dementia.

By Tracy Davenport, Ph.D.

Alzheimer's: 3 Things Siblings Must Do to Stay Sane

Devising a plan is critical to keep stress from straining relationships between siblings.

By Tracy Davenport, Ph.D.

Should You Take Your Kids to Visit Grandma at the Nursing Home?

Do you have a relative who has moved into a nursing home recently? Here’s what to consider before the children visit.

By Tracy Davenport, Ph.D.

Caring for My Mom Has Taught Me to Care for Myself, Too

I have been taking care of my mother, who has dementia, for more than nine years. Some days go by and there are no problems. But other days can be difficult.

By Terry Byrne

Discussing Future Living Arrangements with Aging Parents

When is the right time to talk with your parents about where they want to live in their old age, and how you can help?

By Carol Bradley Bursack

Dating Someone Whose Spouse Has Dementia

When Tami Reeves met her now-husband through an online dating site, he told her that he was still married. He also told her that his wife had Alzheimer’s.

By Nancy Monson

3 Ways Caregivers Can Improve a Relationship

The shift in the relationship that occurs when a parent becomes disabled is an uneasy one for parent and child alike. The crucial issue is often one of control.

By Ronni Sandroff