https://www.healthcentral.com/category/brain-and-nerve-health/tag/fitness

The Latest

teenage girls playing softball

Ready, Set, Go! How to Keep Kids With MS Active

Don’t let a multiple sclerosis diagnosis sideline your kid from sports and play. Give them—and their cardiovascular and muscular systems—a boost with these fitness tips.

By Sheila M. Eldred
young woman using resistance band outdoors

9 Proven Ways Exercise Can Help Manage MS

Staying active can start a positive-feedback loop: Fewer symptoms of multiple sclerosis mean more opportunity to do all the things you love to do.

By K. Aleisha Fetters
Verena Frydberg

11 Exercises for People with SPMS

This plan was developed specifically for people with secondary progressive MS (our fitness model Verena, included!), and each move can be done while sitting in a chair or wheelchair. No gym required!

By Kristen Domonell, M.S., RYT
4 MS exercise illustrations - Bird Dog, Clamshell, Glute Bridge, and Sit-to-Stand

10 Best Strength Exercises for MS

Ready to work it?! Adding a few strength-training moves to your daily routine gives you a powerful way to help manage the physical symptoms of multiple sclerosis.

By K. Aleisha Fetters
4 MS balance exercise illustrations

8 Balance Boosters for MS

More strength! Less chance falling! When you have multiple sclerosis, those are two especially good things. Work these moves into your regular fitness routine, and you'll be steadier on your feet.

By Lambeth Hochwald
Happy young woman stretching for exercise.

Exercise Like Your Brain Depends on It

There’s a new reason we should all be working out regularly. A recent study found that physical fitness also helps us problem-solve and make smarter decisions.

By Stephanie Stephens
Woman stretching arms outside.

10 Ways to Keep (or Improve) Your Balance With MS

Maintaining balance is tough for those of us with MS. These techniques can help prevent falls.

By Tracy Davenport, Ph.D.
Woman stretching leg on boardwalk before running.

Strong Legs, Healthy Brain?

New, cutting edge research suggests neurological health depends on signals sent to the brain by large muscles in the legs, as well as messages sent from the brain to the muscles.

By Diane Domina