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itching arm on park bench

There’s a New Eczema Drug on the Market for Kids

This biologic med has been available to adults and teens for a few years. Now, kids 6 through 11 years old can take it, too.

By Sarah Ellis
exercise while online

9 Sneaky Ways to Move More All Day Long

Desk life is not the best life. If quarantine is getting the best of your bod (and your health), it’s time to get up and move.

By Sarah Ellis
Coronavirus.

10 Important Facts to Know About Coronavirus

Knowledge is power, so here are the stats and facts that will help give you a clearer picture of COVID-19, the new illness making its way around the globe.

By Lara DeSanto
Alzheimer's Hispanic woman

The New Theory About What Causes Alzheimer’s in Women

Women are twice as likely as men to develop Alzheimer’s disease. New research provides a clue about why.

By Sarah Ellis
coughing with COVID-19 mask

5 Potential Long-Term Effects of COVID-19

It’s a new virus, and experts are learning more each day about the ways it could affect you in the months following diagnosis.

By Sarah Ellis
lonely quarantine child

How to Help Kids Deal With Loneliness Right Now

New research reveals the long-term effects of pandemic-related loneliness on kids—and why it may take up to a decade to fully realize its impact.

By Sarah Ellis
kid biking COVID-19 mask

Which Activities Are Safe for Kids This Summer?

Going stir crazy? We asked experts if it’s okay—in the middle of a pandemic—to take kids to the pool, a party, or camp.

By Sarah Ellis
tummy question

Is It IBS or Something Else?

Your gut could be telling you a lot. Read on to learn how to decipher its clues.

By Sarah Ellis
anxious woman

Should Routine Anxiety Screenings Be a Thing?

The Women’s Preventive Services Initiative is recommending that all women over 13 years old get screened for anxiety, due to its prevalence and far-reaching impacts on quality of life.

By Sarah Ellis
feet sticking out of bed

Your Love Life Can Improve Your Health After Breast Cancer

A new study finds that breast cancer survivors in romantic relationships have lower inflammation and less stress.

By Sarah Ellis