Risk Factors

Latest

There's No Such Thing as a 'Depression Gene' After All

Contrary to decades of previous research, there’s no support for the idea that specific genes or gene variants increase your risk of depression on their own, according to a large new study from the University of Colorado Boulder.

By Lara DeSanto

What Is Epigenetics?

Epigenetics theory offers hope that we can end genetic illness.

By Julie A. Fast

Social Media 'Addiction' and Depression in Young Adults

Negative and addictive behaviors on social media platforms are associated with an increased risk for major depressive disorder, according to a survey.

By Diane Domina

Age-Related Hearing Loss Linked to Depression

Older adults with hearing loss are at increased risk for depression and treating age-related hearing loss could reduce rates of depression in the elderly.

By Diane Domina

Depression Can Raise A-Fib Risk

Research suggests people with depression have an increased risk for atrial fibrillation or a-fib, a heart rhythm disorder puts you at higher risk for stroke.

By Diane Domina

Being Overweight Can Lead to Depression

People who are overweight, especially woman, have a greater chance of struggling with depression, according to this study.

By Diane Domina

Abstinence from Moderate Drinking Can Lead to Depression

A study shows that when mice stop drinking moderate levels of alcohol they can become depressed around two weeks later. Here's more information about the association between moderate drinking and depression.

By Jerry Kennard, Ph.D., CPsychol., AFBPsS

Depression and Creativity: Is There a Link?

Some of the world's most creative souls have died by suicide. Sloan Miller examines the relationship between depression and creativity — and shares where to go for help.

By Sloane Miller

How to Plan for a Baby When You've Had Postpartum Depression Before

If you’ve had postpartum depression (PPD) in the past, future pregnancies can be daunting. Here’s how to prepare for the postpartum period.

By Robin Elise Weiss, Ph.D.

IBD: Dealing With Depression

Depression is treatable. Since those with IBD are at higher risk of depression, keeping watch for signs is important.

By Jennifer Mitchell Rackley