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Heart Health

Risk Factors

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11 Ways to Survive a Heart Attack

If you had a heart attack, would you know what to do? These heart-smart tips just might save you.

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10 Ways to Prevent a Heart Attack

Adopt these 10 heart-smart tips now to lower your risk for having a heart attack in the future.

Man vaping marijuana.

Heart Disease an Issue? Be Careful With Marijuana

Whether its use is for fun or function, new research has found a too-significant-to-ignore link between using weed and cardiovascular health.

Shared workspace from above.

Working Too Hard May Raise Your Blood Pressure

Not sure about taking that vacay? A new study—that confirms a link between high blood pressure and working too much—may help you decide.

Portrait of Sandra Holloway

A Beauty Queen Fights Heart Failure

Mom and caregiver Sandra Holloway survived two heart-failure emergencies—now she's dedicated to helping others avoid them.

Two aspirin in hand.

It's Time to Rethink That Aspirin-a-Day

Have you heard? There are brand new guidelines regarding taking aspirin to help prevent heart disease. Here’s what you need to know.

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The Surprising Risks of High Triglycerides

You probably know that high triglycerides can raise your risk of heart disease, but did you realize the condition can impact everything from your eyes to your pancreas? Learn what to watch for—and what to do to protect against complications.

bird's-eye view of tropical beach

One More Great Reason to Take a Vacation

Turn on that out-of-office email reply and get yourself away—your heart will thank you.

Couple brushing their teeth together

For a Healthy Heart, Brush Your Teeth

Brushing your teeth twice a day—and flossing!—may do more for your body than just brighten your smile.

woman taking pill

Lower Breast Cancer Risk With High Cholesterol?

In a surprising twist, women with high cholesterol are 45 percent less likely to develop breast cancer, according to this study. What does this mean?