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Living With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

In living with chronic myelogenous leukemia, you never achieve remission and survivorship; on the other hand, you’re perpetually in survivorship.

By Michele Tschirhart

Journalist’s Leukemia Made Advocacy Personal

When medical journalist Andrew Schorr was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, he could truly connect with his audience about patient empowerment.

By Rachel Zohn

All About Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of certain white blood cells, called myelocytes. It accounts for about one-third of all adult leukemia cases.

By Elizabeth Millard

Use Food to Heal You, Not Harm You

When you’re going through treatment for leukemia, your immune system may be weakened, exposing you to a higher risk of infection — which could even come from your food. Take these measures so your food heals you, not harms you.

By Carmen Roberts, M.S., R.D., L.D.N.

Quiz: Am I Eating This Right?

When you're recovering from leukemia treatments and your immune system is low, are you taking all of the precautions necessary to ensure you're not putting yourself at risk for infection, like salmonella?

By Carmen Roberts, M.S., R.D., L.D.N.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: The Big Picture

Explore these long-term considerations, from fertility preservation to how to develop a survivorship care plan.

By Sheila M. Eldred

What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a slow-growing cancer and the most common type of leukemia in adults. Find out what to expect and how to navigate treatment and survivorship.

By Eileen Bailey

Surviving Leukemia Treatment and Its Long-Term Side Effects

As leukemia treatments become more effective and patients live longer, long-term and late side effects have become an area of growing concern.

By Katherine Malmo

Blood Bond: When Your Sister's the Stem Cell Match

A leukemia survivor (and grateful brother) shares the story of how his sister’s stem cells saved his life. Learn what it feels like to receive a stem cell transplant.

By Judi Ebbert, PhD, MPH, RN