Diagnosis

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Top Resources for Help with Anxiety

Where to go for help with anxiety? Start with this list of nine top resources, including help for veterans, students, and employees.

By Eileen Bailey

What You Need to Know About Globus Hystericus

Anxiety can sometimes cause a lump-in-the-throat sensation known as globus hystericus. Learn about this condition and what you can do to relieve discomfort.

By Merely Me

Food, Medicine, and Healing: One Woman’s Story of Empowerment

Brandi Blouch spent 10 years shuffled around to various doctors. When she turned to integrative medicine her world changed. Now she empowers others.

By Brandi Blouch

How to Get the Right Care for Bipolar Disorder

The average bipolar patient spends 10 years finding the right treatment. Michael Pipich offers families and patients a more direct route.

By Michael G. Pipich

Gaming Addiction: Understanding This Modern Diagnosis

Gaming addiction is real and troubling. So why isn’t it included in the DSM-V? Learn more about the disorder: its history, symptoms, and treatment options.

By Amy Hendel, P.A.

What Are the Steps to Take After a Bipolar Disorder and Depression Diagnosis?

You’ve just received the news – you have bipolar disorder and depression. What do you do next? Learn more here.

By Eileen Bailey

What You Need to Know About Bipolar Disorder

Want to truly understand yourself or a loved one with bipolar disorder? Read nine these facts that will change your understanding forever.

By John McManamy

Misconceptions About Bipolar Disorder

Even the best psychiatrists have set ideas about bipolar disorder that aren’t entirely accurate. Hear from the perspective of someone with the illness.

By John McManamy

Knowing the Differences Between Mental Disorders

The current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), the psychiatrist’s “Bible,” lists several hundred disorders – one in five American adults has at least one.

By Stephanie Stephens

Grief After an IBD Diagnosis, It's Natural

Feelings of grief and loss, similar to losing a loved one, can often occur after an IBD diagnosis due to not feeling like your ‘old self’ anymore.

By Mandy Morgan