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Multiple Sclerosis

Risk Factors

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Injection drugs

Slowing Down Long-Term Progression of Multiple Sclerosis With Disease-Modifying Therapies

A number of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) are effective in decreasing the frequency of relapses and the number of lesions in the brain or spinal cord.

Egg and avocado are biotin-rich foods.

Biotin: What Is It, and How Much Is Optimal?

Biotin can help with diabetes and multiple sclerosis, but it can also interfere with medications for hypothyroidism. Here’s what you need to know.

Doctor explaining diagnosis to a patient.

Comorbidity and Multiple Sclerosis: What You Need to Know

Living with MS is hard. Having additional conditions, or comorbidity, makes it even harder. Identify some comorbid conditions and find out what you can do to protect your health.

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Hypertension and MS: What You Need to Know

Recent studies show that hypertension affects between 17 to 30 percent of people with MS. Find out more about the link between multiple sclerosis and high blood pressure.

Patient hand with V sign and the tube of normal saline infusion on white cloth background.

Four MS Infusion Options and How to Prepare for Them

Learn about the four main infusion therapies available for MS today – the course of treatment and what you need to know on infusion day.

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MS Safety Tips for the Shower

If you live with MS, you know that getting clean can come with some risks. Learn tips for avoiding danger in the shower.

Child holding red heart in hands.

Mother’s Day When You Can't Have Children

Mother’s Day is a day of celebration — but for those who can’t bear children because of a chronic condition like rheumatoid arthritis, it can be a struggle.

Young black woman at cafe using laptop researching CIS.

What Is Clinically Isolated Syndrome?

When someone experiences only one episode of MS-like symptoms, it is known as clinically isolated syndrome. Here’s how it is – and isn’t – like other forms of the disease.