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Sleep Disorders

Risk Factors

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Risk Factors for Age-Related Sleep Deprivation

How does sleep change as we get older, and what can we do to prevent our sleep from getting worse?

Senior woman visiting an optometrist.

Eyesight Loss with Diabetes Worsened by OSA

Diabetes puts you at risk of vision loss. If you also have obstructive sleep apnea, that risk goes even higher.

Revealed: America’s Most Sleep Challenged Jobs

A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified the careers associated with the highest rates of short sleep duration. Is your job on the list?

Child snoring in bed

Untreated Childhood Sleep Apnea Harms Brain

Childhood sleep apnea often goes undiagnosed and can harm brain cells linked to cognition and mood.

Tired mother asleep next to awake baby's crib

Naps Help Babies Learn and Remember New Words

Sleep is essential at all stages of life, but it’s absolutely critical for childhood learning.

Upset teen girl covering face with hand

Weekend Lie-ins May Be Bad for Teen Mental Health

Is your teen sleeping in a lot on the weekend? Learn how inconsistent sleep patterns may indicate that something is wrong.

Woman using a smartphone in bed

How Your Mind Can Act as a Barrier to Sleep

Feelings of stress and worry can harm sleep by causing a state of hyperarousal. But does your age make you more vulnerable?

Man laying awake

Insomnia Linked to Heart Events

Meta-analysis ties insomnia to dire health issues, including heart attack and stroke risk. Use the following tips to improve sleep quality and prevent insomnia.

Man experiencing abdominal pain in bed

Can Sleep Really be Affected by Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Although sleep complaints are a common symptom of irritable bowel syndrome, researchers have often struggled to confirm them.

Risks of Sleep Apnea for Angioplasty Patients

Risks of Sleep Apnea for Angioplasty Patients

Have you had an angioplasty? And do you have sleep apnea? Patients with well-controlled apnea fare better than those whose symptoms go untreated, a study shows.