https://www.healthcentral.com/condition/arrhythmias
Heart DiseaseArrhythmias

Let’s Talk About Arrhythmias

Whether your heart is beating too fast, too slowly, or erratically, this condition can feel scary. We’ll walk you through it all, one beat at a time.

    Our Pro PanelArrhythmias

    We went to some of the nation’s top experts in arrhythmias to bring you the most up-to-date information possible.

    Daniel Cantillon, M.D.

    Daniel Cantillon, M.D.Electrophysiologist

    Cleveland Clinic
    Cleveland, OH
    Laurence Mark Epstein M.D.

    Laurence M. Epstein, M.D.System Director of Electrophysiology

    Northwell Health
    Manhasset, NY
    Aurelio Duran, M.D.

    Aurelio Duran, M.D.Electrophysiologist

    Orlando Health
    Orlando, FL

    Frequently Asked QuestionsArrhythmias

    What might trigger my arrhythmia?

    Triggers vary from person to person. Some people are very sensitive to caffeine. Stress and lack of sleep can also increase your likelihood of your heart going haywire. Alcohol can be a trigger as well.

    Can my arrhythmia be cured?

    Procedures like catheter ablation can eliminate an arrhythmia so that your heart beats normally. It’s especially effective with supraventricular tachycardias like Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. But even arrhythmias that can’t be permanently stopped, such as atrial fibrillation, can often be successfully managed.

    Can an arrhythmia kill me?

    Yes, some can be life-threatening. Atrial fibrillation, for instance, is a leading cause of preventable stroke. That's why it's critical for doctors to identify patients at risk of lethal arrhythmias, such as ventricular fibrillation.

    But isn’t it true that most arrhythmias are harmless?

    That’s correct, but you should always pay attention to irregularities in your heartbeat, particularly if you have some form of heart disease. Even if your arrhythmia is harmless, talk to your doctor if it’s causing you to worry.

    Matt McMillen

    Matt McMillen

    Matt McMillen has been a freelance health reporter since 2002. In that time he’s covered everything from acupuncture to the Zika virus.