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Lymphoma

Let's Talk About Lymphoma

We've got the doctor-approved details on lymphoma causes, symptoms, treatments, and a jillion other facts and tips that can make facing life with this disease easier.

    Our Pro PanelLymphoma

    We went to some of the nation's top experts in lymphoma to bring you the most up-to-date information possible.

    Jasmine Zain, M.D.

    Jasmine Zain, M.D.Director of the T Cell Lymphoma Program

    City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center
    Los Angeles, CA
    Dhimant Patel, M.D.

    Dhimant Patel, M.D.Hematologist and Oncologist

    Aurora BayCare Medical Center
    Green Bay, WI
    Andreas Klein, M.D.

    Andreas Klein, M.D.Associate Chief, Division of Hematology Oncology

    Tufts Medical Center
    Boston, MA

    Frequently Asked QuestionsLymphoma

    What is lymphoma?

    Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system. It’s sometimes called a blood cancer, or a “liquid” cancer. It happens when certain white blood cells known as lymphocytes mutate and start growing out of control. There are two main types of lymphoma: Hodgkin’s lymphoma (formerly known as Hodgkin’s disease) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    What causes lymphoma?

    Doctors don’t know exactly, but lymphoma is likely related to DNA damage. Genes known as “oncogenes” trigger cell growth, while “tumor suppressor genes” slow it down—mistakes and mutations in a person’s DNA can turn these genes on or off, potentially leading to lymphoma. Lymphoma is not thought to be linked to genes or mutations passed down by our parents.

    Are Hodgkin’s disease and lymphoma the same thing?

    Yes. There are two main types of lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Hodgkin’s lymphoma used to be known as Hodgkin’s disease, after Thomas Hodgkin, the doctor who first described it in 1832.

    What is leukemia vs. lymphoma?

    Leukemia and lymphoma are both blood cancers that develop when white blood cells grow out of control. Lymphoma cells form tumors in the lymph nodes and other organs of the lymphatic system. In leukemia, the cancerous white blood cells don’t form tumors.

    Sunny Sea Gold

    Sunny Sea Gold

    @sunnyseagold

    Sunny is a health journalist, book author, and essayist living in Portland, OR.