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ObesityObesity Treatment

Let's Talk About Obesity Treatment

There are obesity treatments that can make losing weight a little less of a battle. They can add years to your life, too.

    Our Pro PanelObesity Treatment

    We went to some of the nation's top experts on obesity to bring you the most up-to-date information possible.

    Deborah Bade Horn, D.O., M.P.H.

    Deborah Bade Horn, D.O.Medical Director; Assistant Professor of Surgery

    Center for Obesity Medicine & Metabolic Performance; University of Texas McGovern Medical School
    Houston
    Donna H. Ryan, M.D.

    Donna H. Ryan, M.D.Professor Emerita

    Pennington Biomedical
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Matt Hutter, M.D., M.P.H.

    Matt Hutter, M.D.President; Professor of Surgery; Director

    American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery; Harvard Medical School; American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery
    Boston

    Frequently Asked QuestionsObesity Treatment

    What is the best medicine for obesity?

    Several anti-obesity medications (AOMs) have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for weight loss and chronic weight management. The AOMs Qsymia, Saxenda, and Contrave reliably help people lose 8% to 14% of their total body weight. There’s no one best med; the goal with all AOMs is to achieve 4% to 5% weight loss after three months at the full prescribing dose. If that hasn’t happened, it may be time to try another AOM.

    Is obesity a disease?

    Yes, it is. When the American Medical Association officially recognized this in 2013, it was an important step forward in terms of educating millions of people, including health care providers, about the fact that obesity is not a personal choice or a character flaw.

    Does the Keto diet work if you are obese?

    Keto may work in the short term—by providing a limited framework for making food choices—but research has shown that long-term adherence is tricky.

    What illnesses can obesity cause?

    Having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or above, which is technically considered obese, comes with many weight-related health complications including cardiovascular issues, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, and type 2 diabetes.

    Leslie Goldman

    Leslie Goldman

    @LeslieGoldman

    Leslie Goldman is a health and wellness writer who regularly contributes feature stories and essays to various publications.