Quack Cures for Multiple Sclerosis

Chris Regal | Apr 18th 2012 Oct 10th 2017

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Multiple Sclerosis patient and former TV investigative reporter, Ellen Burstein MacFarlane, wrote a book about her life with MS as well as her victimization by a Doctor Irving Dardik, MD who claimed he could cure MS with his special method.What was the name of his special treatment which ended up costing his victims from $30,000-$100,000?
  1. 1 Coral Calcium Treatment
  2. 0 Procarin skin cream
  3. 0 Superesonant Wavenergy (SRWE) Program
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The book is called _Legwork:An Inspiring Journey Through a Chronic Illness_, where MacFarlane details her story of being swindled out of $100,000 by Doctor Dardik who claimed that his exercise program would reverse the effects of Multiple Sclerosis. In 1995 this doctor was found guilty of fraud and his medical license was revoked.

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  1. Multiple Sclerosis patient and former TV investigative reporter, Ellen Burstein MacFarlane, wrote a book about her life with MS as well as her victimization by a Doctor Irving Dardik, MD who claimed he could cure MS with his special method.What was the name of his special treatment which ended up costing his victims from $30,000-$100,000?

    Correct Answer: Coral Calcium Treatment

    The book is called _Legwork:An Inspiring Journey Through a Chronic Illness_, where MacFarlane details her story of being swindled out of $100,000 by Doctor Dardik who claimed that his exercise program would reverse the effects of Multiple Sclerosis. In 1995 this doctor was found guilty of fraud and his medical license was revoked.

  2. Which dietary supplement was heavily promoted by a man named Robert Barefoot using nationally televised 30-minute infomercials which aired on such cable channels such as Bravo, The Discovery Channel, and Comedy Central and was touted as being able to cause people in wheelchairs able to get up and walk?

    Correct Answer: Coral Calcium

    Barefoot claims that coral calcium comes from "remnants of living coral that have fallen from coral reefs, as a result of wave action or other natural processes." This is blatantly false especially since coral reefs are protected by law. Coral calcium is instead, made by grinding up limestone that no longer contains live organisms. There is no evidence that coral calcium is of any benefit whatsoever to MS patients and the Federal Trade Commission has since charged Barefoot with false advertising.

  3. Which type of therapy was denounced by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society following the death of a woman who had received this type of treatment?

    Correct Answer: Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy

    Katherine Bibeau, a 53-year-old mother of two, and a sufferer of Multiple Sclerosis went to see a doctor named James Shortt to receive an infusion of hydrogen peroxide to help cure her MS. This fatal injection produced bubbles in Bibeau's bloodstream which resulted in multiple organ failure and cardiac arrest. This type of therapy is also promoted for cancer patients resulting in yet another death - this time it was Michael Bate, a 66-year-old retired engineer, with advanced prostate cancer who was the victim of this dangerous fraud.

  4. Which of these "cures" for MS was also used by Michael Jackson in a much publicized photo of the pop star utilizing this particular treatment for its supposed rejuvenating properties?

    Correct Answer: Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber

    The Hyperbaric oxygen chamber has reportedly been used by Michael Jackson to retain a more youthful appearance. Others use it in hopes for a cure for a wide variety of disorders including Autism, heart disease, asthma, and Multiple Sclerosis. Proponents of this method think that the nerve damage in MS is due to a lack of oxygen. There is no scientific proof of this hypothesis and there is the potential for harm including experiencing severe pulmonary and central nervous system symptoms as the result of this treatment.

  5. In 2005 a study was done to test the effectiveness of which popular alternative therapy for the treatment of MS, concluding that the use of this particular treatment "...in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis did not reduce disease activity, disability, or fatigue and did not improve quality of life."

    Correct Answer: Bee sting therapy

    T. Wesselius, et al published the outcome of their study in the December 2005 issue of _Neurology_, showing that bee venom therapy had no effect upon decreasing the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis. Despite warnings from scientific journals and doctors, many people still wish to subject themselves to the regimen of letting bees sting them up to twenty times per treatment session. Ouch!