Seasonal vs. Year-Round Allergies

Allison Tsai | Oct 11, 2012

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You have symptoms such as sneezing and sniffling, or red, itchy, watery eyes only at certain times of the year, especially when you go outdoors.
  1. 1 True
  2. 0 False
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Spring, summer and fall are when most people with seasonal allergies have symptoms. Some people suffer during all of those seasons, while others only notice the symptoms during one or two of the seasons. If you live in the south, even winter could be your season for allergies.

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  1. You have symptoms such as sneezing and sniffling, or red, itchy, watery eyes only at certain times of the year, especially when you go outdoors.

    Correct Answer: True

    Spring, summer and fall are when most people with seasonal allergies have symptoms. Some people suffer during all of those seasons, while others only notice the symptoms during one or two of the seasons. If you live in the south, even winter could be your season for allergies.

  2. Every kind of tree is a potential seasonal allergy trigger.

    Correct Answer: False

    Tree pollen is the real allergy culprit, but it's primarily from certain tree types including red cedar, cypress, elm, hickory, walnut, and maple trees among others. These trees produce pollen mostly in the spring. If you live in Texas, you might have tree pollen allergies in the winter months too, when the mountain cedar is pollinating.

  3. Dust is a seasonal allergy trigger.

    Correct Answer: False

    Although people with seasonal allergies can be allergic to dust mites, dust is always in our environment, so it is considered a year round allergy trigger, not a seasonal one.

  4. If I am allergic to pollen, then I will never have allergy symptoms in the wintertime.

    Correct Answer: False

    Though most pollinating plants are dormant in the winter, pollen can sometimes be carried indoors. For example, pollen is sometimes carried indoors in December on Christmas tree trunks where it collected the previous summer or fall.

  5. If I have seasonal allergies, then my child will most likely have them as well.

    Correct Answer: True

    When a parent has allergies or asthma, then a child is also very likely to develop them sometime during early childhood. If both parents have them, the risk increases. It is not possible to predict whether the child's allergies will be seasonal, however.

  6. Seasonal allergies tend to be milder than year-round allergies.

    Correct Answer: False

    If you are only allergic to things that bloom in the spring, for example, then the rest of the yearyou may feel quite good. However, your symptoms during that time may be every bit as severe and bothersome as those felt by year-round sufferers.

  7. Medicine is not the most effective way to deal with seasonal allergies.

    Correct Answer: True

    Using a combination of trigger avoidance and an allergy medicine is the best way to keep allergy symptoms at bay.

  8. Seasonal allergies are treated differently than year-round allergies.

    Correct Answer: False

    As mentioned in the previous answer, avoiding your allergy triggers is the best way to prevent allergy symptoms, whether they are seasonal or year-round.