How Well Do You Understand Adult ADHD?

Eileen Bailey | Feb 7, 2018

1 of 8
True or False? Adults with ADHD only have mild symptoms, and a few lifestyle changes can control these symptoms.
  1. 0 True
  2. 1 False
YOUR SCORE
0
0

You are correct! You are incorrect!

False. Research estimates 4.1 percent of adults have ADHD. Among adults with ADHD, with 41.3 percent say they have severe symptoms, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Adults with ADHD may experience problems at work, difficulty with day-to-day responsibilities, relationship problems, and chronic feelings of frustration or guilt, according to the National Resource Center on ADHD.

Your Results

YOU GOT 37% CORRECT
YOUR SCORE
0
0
  1. 1

    True or False? Adults with ADHD only have mild symptoms, and a few lifestyle changes can control these symptoms.

    Correct Answer: False

    False. Research estimates 4.1 percent of adults have ADHD. Among adults with ADHD, with 41.3 percent say they have severe symptoms, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Adults with ADHD may experience problems at work, difficulty with day-to-day responsibilities, relationship problems, and chronic feelings of frustration or guilt, according to the National Resource Center on ADHD.

  2. 2

    What percentage of children diagnosed with ADHD will continue to have ADHD symptoms into adulthood?

    Correct Answer: 60 percent

    About 60 percent of children diagnosed with ADHD will continue to have symptoms into adulthood, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

  3. 3

    True or False? ADHD can begin in adulthood.

    Correct Answer: False

    False. In order to be diagnosed with ADHD, symptoms must appear before the age of 12, according to the nonprofit Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD). Many people are diagnosed with ADHD in adulthood, but that doesn’t mean their symptoms began in adulthood — it just means they were not diagnosed until later in life.

  4. 4

    Executive function deficits are key factors in the everyday difficulties faced by adults with ADHD. Executive function affects how people:

    Correct Answer: All of the above

    All of the above. Executive function is the brain’s ability to prioritize and manage thoughts and actions, according to the National Resource Center on ADHD. Executive function helps people organize, regulate emotions, consider the long-term consequences of actions, and manage their time.

  5. 5

    True or False? Diagnosing adults with ADHD can sometimes be difficult because other conditions, such as depression and anxiety, share some of the symptoms of ADHD.

    Correct Answer: True

    True. More than two-thirds of people with ADHD have one or more coexisting conditions, according to CHADD. For that reason, a comprehensive evaluation for ADHD includes screening for depression, anxiety, learning disabilities, and substance abuse, all of which can sometimes be mistaken for ADHD.

  6. 6

    What percentage of adults who are living with ADHD are properly diagnosed?

    Correct Answer: 20 percent

    It is estimated that only about 20 percent of adults who are living with ADHD successfully are diagnosed and/or treated for ADHD, according to a 2006 study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

  7. 7

    True or False? When treating someone with ADHD and coexisting conditions, ADHD should always be the first condition treated.

    Correct Answer: False

    False. The disorder that is causing the highest level of impairment should be treated first, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. If symptoms of ADHD are the most troubling to the person, then ADHD should be treated as a priority. But if, for example, substance abuse or depression are causing more impairment than ADHD, it’s important to treat those conditions first. Once the most severe condition is stabilized, all coexisting conditions can be treated simultaneously.

  8. 8

    The first line of treatment for adult ADHD is:

    Correct Answer: Stimulant medications

    The first line of treatment for ADHD is stimulant medication, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Many adults with ADHD also benefit from other treatments, which may include cognitive behavioral therapy, coaching, and behavioral therapy.