10 Teas That Can Help With Insomnia Relief

Martin Reed | July 6, 2016

1 of 12
1 of 12
Credit: Thinkstock

Nature offers a number of natural stress relievers and sedatives. The following botanicals can all be consumed as a tea that can reduce worry, calm the mind, and prepare your body for sleep.

2 of 12

1. Chamomile flowers

Credit: Thinkstock

The chamomile flower is known to reduce stress and hyperactivity. It has a refreshing taste with a floral, slightly citrus aroma.

Steep one tablespoon of dried chamomile flowers in one cup of just-boiled water for three to five minutes.

Availability: Widely available in grocery and health food stores.

Precautions: No known precautions.

3 of 12

2. Hop flowers

Credit: iStock

One of the most important components of beer can also be used in a tea to help you sleep. Perhaps unsurprising when you consider that hops are actually related to cannabis!

Due to the bitterness of hop flowers, this ingredient is best blended with other ingredients. An equal blend of hops with chamomile, sweetened with a touch of honey, is recommended.

Availability: Widely available (and often freshest) in homebrew stores. Precautions: No known precautions.

4 of 12

3. Lemon balm

Credit: Thinkstock

The leaves of this aromatic perennial are known for their natural sedative qualities. Lemon balm promotes sleep and relaxation and also supports digestive health. Lemon balm should be steeped for at least 30 minutes (overnight is even better).

Availability: Health food stores and online.

Precautions: No known precautions.

5 of 12

4. Passionflower

Credit: Thinkstock

The leaves, stems, and flowers of the passionflower plant can help reduce anxiety and calm an overactive mind. Passionflower is a natural sedative and can even help lower blood pressure.

Steep two tablespoons of dried passionflower in one cup of just-boiled water for 10 to 15 minutes.

Availability: Health food stores and online.

Precautions: No known precautions.

6 of 12

5. Valerian root

Credit: Thinkstock

Valerian works as a sedative. It can quiet and soothe the brain and nervous system. The taste of valerian by itself can be unpleasant, but it blends well with honey.

Steep one teaspoon of valerian in one cup of just-boiled water for around 15 minutes.

Availability: Health food stores and online.

Precautions: Valerian may increase the effects of barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and other sedative drugs.

7 of 12

6. Hibiscus flowers

Credit: Thinkstock

These flowers come in a variety of colors. When consumed as a tea, hibiscus has a calming effect and may help reduce blood pressure.

Steep one-and-a-half teaspoons of hibiscus flowers in one cup of just-boiled water for around 20 minutes.

Availability: Health food stores and online.

Precautions: Hibiscus is sometimes grown alongside peanuts. Those with peanut allergies should exercise caution since contamination is possible.

8 of 12

7. Lavender flowers

Credit: Thinkstock

This flower promotes relaxation and drinking lavender tea may help reduce anxiety, irritability and tension headaches.

Steep two tablespoons of fresh lavender flowers (or one tablespoon of dry lavender flowers) in a cup of just-boiled water for five minutes.

Availability: Health food stores and online.

Precautions: No known precautions.

9 of 12

8. Red ginseng

The root of red ginseng can help promote sleep by helping the body deal with stress and nervous exhaustion.

Steep one tablespoon of thinly sliced ginseng root in just-boiled water for five minutes.

Availability: Health food stores and online.

Precautions: Can enhance the effects of caffeine and other stimulants.

10 of 12

9. Skullcap

A type of mint, skullcap acts as a mild sedative, especially when blended in equal parts with hops and valerian root. Skullcap may also help alleviate tension, headaches, and PMS symptoms.

Steep one-and-a-half teaspoons of skullcap in one cup of just-boiled water for ten minutes.

Availability: Health food stores and online.

Precautions: No known precautions.

11 of 12

10. Bananas

Bananas (and their peel) contain high levels of potassium and magnesium. That’s good news, since magnesium and potassium deficiency has been associated with trouble sleeping. To make a banana tea, simply cut both ends off of one banana, boil for 10 minutes and pour the water into a mug.

Availability: Widely available in grocery stores.

Precautions: No known precautions.

12 of 12

They’re an acquired taste!

Some of the teas we’ve suggested may not taste great on their own. By sweetening or blending with other herbs they can be far more palatable – but avoid the temptation to add sugar or artificial sweeteners since these can act as a stimulant. Instead, sweeten with honey to further boost the sedative qualities of your tea.