Do's and Don'ts for Scalp Psoriasis

Alisha Bridges | Jun 21st 2016 Apr 10th 2017

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Scalp psoriasis often requires treatments that are different from what’s used when the condition affects other areas of the body, due to the thickness of the skin on the scalp and hair. So before you reach for any creams or medications, here are some do’s and don’ts for handling psoriasis of the scalp.

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DO Investigate symptoms

Even though half of psoriasis suffers will experience symptoms on their scalp, many mistake the white flakes for dandruff and don’t receive proper treatment until the condition becomes unbearable. And at that point, it can be a tricky condition to manage.

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DO use shampoos that contain tar or salicylic acid

Tar has proven effective as a treatment for psoriasis for decades, but applying it can be messy, time consuming and changes can take time. Salicylic acid can also be useful, but can result in temporary hair loss if left on the scalp for too long. Additionally, over the counter scale softeners can be placed on the scalp to help loosen scales. The downside is that while these products can help with psoriasis, they often dry out the hair.

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DON’T use harmful chemicals

For years I used relaxers to straighten my hair, but eventually chemicals became too harsh for my scalp to bare. So I stopped using relaxers and honestly my scalp has improved tremendously. While you may not necessarily be using relaxers or perms, you might still be using chemicals that are too harsh on your scalp. Healthchild.org provides a list of product ingredients to avoid on your hair, here.

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DO use natural products

The best natural products for your hair and scalp are usually the ingredients you can also ingest. As a child, I remember my grandmother using apple cider vinegar to grease my scalp, as it can help with infections and scaling. Other scalp-friendly products include olive oil, coconut oil, and avocado.

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DON’T use hot water

Like the rest of your body, the scalp can be negatively affected by hot water. It can also be counterproductive for your condition, drying out your skin and making you more prone to having a flare. For scalp psoriasis, I recommend using lukewarm water, as a nurse once suggested to me years ago.

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DO consult a doctor before you use meds for body or scalp

Just because it can go on your body doesn’t mean its suitable for your scalp. The NPF states that there are a variety of topicals that are safe for both the body and scalp, some of which include anthralin, dovonex, taclonex and tazorac. Also be sure not to use anything prescribed for the scalp unless directed by a doctor.

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DON’T wear dark colored shirts

It’s important to wear whatever feels comfortable, whether it’s dark or light, but some choose not to wear dark colors because flakes can be very noticeable. Lighter color clothing or shirts with prints can help camouflage flakes or reduce the appearance of them.

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DON'T be afraid to speak up about symptoms and treatment options

Inform your doctor know immediately if you notice plaques in your scalp. Ignoring these symptoms could worsen the disease and increase the risk of hair loss. You may also want to talk with your doctor about systemic drugs, which target the entire body including the scalp, without having to apply topical treatments directly.

NEXT: What Psoriasis Sufferers Are Tired of Hearing