10 Resources to Help You As a Lung Cancer Patient

Health Writer
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Facing a diagnosis of lung cancer brings with it many challenges — physical, financial, emotional, and spiritual. There are many organizations ready to help. Here’s a small sampling of those organizations.

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Meal Train: Organize food needs

The symptoms of lung cancer and side-effects of treatments can leave you fatigued and overwhelmed. Family and friends may be willing to help out, if they just knew what to bring and when you need it. That’s where Meal Train comes in. This is an online tool to help you, or your family, organize your meal needs. You can sign up and put in your preferences and allergies. Then, you can send invitations out to friends and relatives, who can sign up to make and deliver a meal to you and your family.

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Free house cleaning available

You need to focus on your health, not on housecleaning. At least that is the idea behind Cleaning for a Reason, a non-profit, nationwide organization that offers free house cleaning for women undergoing treatment for cancer. The service provides one general house cleaning per month for two consecutive months. Cleaning services around the country volunteer their time to help those going through cancer treatments.

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CaringBridge: An online journal to connect you to others

Tell your story to family and friends on CaringBridge. This site allows you to share health updates, including photos and videos, with people who care about you. You set up the privacy of your own CaringBridge site, so you know exactly who is seeing the information. In addition, you can use the site to reach out and ask for help and coordinate the help that you need.

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LungMATCH: One stop shop

LungMATCH is a comprehensive service where you can find information about treatment options, talk to a specialist regarding treatment and testing, including molecular testing for targeted treatments, and search for a clinical trial. It’s all brought to you by the Lung Cancer Alliance.

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Need financial assistance?

Whether you have health insurance or not, cancer treatment is expensive. You might need transportation or lodging to receive treatment in a different city. You might need help with housing, food, dental work, lab tests, or medication. A Helping Hand can help you find the financial assistance you need. It is an online, searchable database of financial resources for those with cancer.

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Legal help is close by

The Cancer Legal Resource Center works to provide advocacy to people with cancer, disabilities, and other serious illnesses. They are available by telephone and also have outreach programs in a number of communities around the country. Whether you need help with insurance, employment issues, government benefits, medical leave or estate planning, they can help.

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Patient Advocate Foundation can help with all those difficult questions

The Patient Advocate Foundation can help answer your questions about health insurance, employment, creditors, debt crisis, and more. They provide arbitration, mediation, and negotiations on your behalf for applying for resources, talking to your insurance company or applying for Social Security Disability.

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Continuing your career

Working while undergoing cancer treatment is difficult. You might have trouble finding a job or holding on to the one you have with time off for treatment. Cancer and Careers gives you a place to start with any workplace questions you might have. You can create an action plan and get help whether you are looking for work or working through your treatment.

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Community resources provide useful info

The American Cancer Society and the United Way can provide you with resources that may be available in your area. These can include support groups, education about cancer, help with transportation to doctor’s visits, and connecting you with local agencies that can help.