7 Delicious Mocktail Recipes to Try During Pregnancy

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During pregnancy, there are certain things you have to give up. Alcohol is one of those things. Though most people are aware of the risks of drinking in pregnancy, including fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), we may forget how often we use celebratory alcoholic drinks in our lives. The good news is that being pregnant doesn’t mean you can’t have some fun — just that you need to avoid alcohol.  Here are some tasty nonalcoholic drinks that everyone can enjoy, during the holidays or anytime at all.


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Shirley Temple

The Shirley Temple is probably one of the best-known nonalcoholic drinks, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t give it a try. You’ll need orange juice, ginger ale, Grenadine, and cherries. Add a splash of Grenadine in the bottom of your cup, layer about one-fourth of the rest of the cup with orange juice, top it off with the ginger ale, and decorate it with a cherry. If you pour it right, it’s a beautiful drink, so consider a clear cup!


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Mojito mocktail

This take on the classic involves ½ ounce of lime juice, ½ ounce of agave nectar, and ½ ounce of orange juice muddled with three or four mint leaves and served chilled. Traditionally, mojitos are served in a Collins glass.


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Alcohol-free mimosas

This is perfect for a brunch or baby shower! The simple ingredients are one part orange juice and one part ginger ale or lemon-lime soda — your choice. These are typically served in champagne flute glasses, but you can change that up based on your preference. This is best served chilled, and traditionally there is no garnish.


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Lavender lemonade

This option is a bit more work, but worth it. First, you make lavender syrup, using ½ cup of water, ½ cup of sugar, and 1 tablespoon of dried lavender. Bring it to a boil, and then turn off the heat and let it cool. Strain the solids out before using it. Combine ¼ teaspoon of Grenadine, ¼ cup of lemon juice, and 1 ½ tablespoons of the syrup you made in a shaker with ice. Shake it up, strain it into a glass, and fill the glass with club soda. For a pretty touch, garnish with a sprig of lavender.


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Orange mango coconut water

This drink takes three oranges, skinned and juiced, blended with ½ of a mango and 1 cup of coconut water. It’s a bit thick, but it can be thinned by adding more coconut water. This is a great fruity choice and certainly on the healthier side.


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Christmas punch

Don’t let the name fool you — you could serve this year-round! You’ll need 5 cups of tropical punch, 1 cup of pineapple juice, 1 cup of cranberry juice, and 5 cups of lemon-lime soda, all chilled. Pour those together in your punch bowl, and scoop in a pint of raspberry sherbet. This is lovely garnished with slices of limes and oranges.


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Pomegranate lime sparkle

Using two parts pomegranate juice and one part lime juice, with a sparkle of either sparkling water or lemon-lime soda, you can create a refreshing but tart drink. Elevate this mocktail with a slice or spiral of lime. For that extra touch, you can even serve it in a glass that is rimmed with sugar. Colorful sugars can also add a festive element. You can play with the ratios to get just the right mixture for you; if it’s too tart, start with backing off the lime juice.


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Sparkling cider

Sparkling ciders are a brilliant alternative to champagne. The look of the bottle and the uncorking or opening process make it feel authentic. There are a variety of flavors, and, as long as the cider is pasteurized, they are safe for pregnant consumption. Pull out your champagne flutes and pour away, as these are great for any celebration, from an anniversary dinner to New Year’s Eve.


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What you should know about ‘near beer’

There is a whole category of drinks like "near beer." These are designed to taste like regular, alcohol-filled drinks, like beer, but with almost no alcohol. The problem with drinking them in pregnancy is that there is still some alcohol in them, and their labels can be misleading. Therefore, it's currently recommended that they not be consumed in pregnancy because there is no safe level alcohol level known for pregnant women.


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Skip the fancy drinks altogether

You might be someone who doesn’t really care what’s in your glass, who is just as happy to have orange juice or water as some of the fancy drinks that may be served at special occasions. If that's you, drink up and toast to a healthy baby with whatever nonalcoholic drink is handy and quenches your thirst. Cheers!