Chronic Life

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Caffeine May Extend Life Expectancy in People With Kidney Disease

People with chronic kidney disease can help lengthen their life expectancy by consuming more caffeine, suggest results of a new study.

By Diane Domina

10 Crohn's Diets: How (and if) They Work

Plant-based? Gluten-free? Keto? While no single diet has been successfully proven to control Crohn’s, here’s what we do know about how popular diets may affect your health.

By Tracy Davenport, Ph.D.

U.S. Deaths From Wildfire Smoke Could Double

In a study simulating the effects of wildfire smoke on health, researchers found deaths from smoke could rise from 15,000 per year to more than 40,000.

By Diane Domina

3 Tips for Dining Out With Crohn’s Disease

Going to a restaurant for a meal with family and friends? Don’t let IBD get in the way of a good time.

By Tracy Davenport, Ph.D.

A Letter to My Younger Self, Before IBD Diagnosis

Mandy writes to her prediagnosis self about living with ulcerative colitis (UC) and what she wishes she had known.

By Mandy Morgan

Married to Someone With IBD? This Letter's for You

Being the spouse to someone with UC can be challenging, but this woman with UC has a message for you: You’re the real MVP.

By Jackie Zimmerman

Finding Yourself Again When You Have Ankylosing Spondylitis

Do you have that place you can go that makes you feel like… you? The place where your chronic condition doesn't matter, and you feel like you're more than your condition? For Charis, that place is Burning Man.

By Charis Hill

How I Manage IBD With an Olympic Mindset

Crohn’s and UC can break down your body, and it can take years to build your health back up. Here’s how one man did it through fitness.

By Brian Greenberg

Are You Still Working With Chronic Illness? Should You Be?

Living with a chronic illness is challenging. Living with a chronic illness while working a full-time job? Sometimes unbearable. It might be time to scale back.

By Jackie Zimmerman

Women Are More Likely Than Men to Have a Chronic Disease

Just what every woman wants to hear. But, unfortunately, 38 percent of American women have at least one chronic health condition, compared to 30 percent of men. Find out what it’s costing women — in finances and life.

By Lene Andersen, MSW