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Memory Loss

The Latest

Walking on boardwalk.

Stepping to It

Twenty minutes—or less—a day of breaking a sweat is all you need to reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

woman with bald head looking out window

Do You Have 'Chemobrain'?

If you feel confused or have trouble focusing as you go through cancer treatment, it could be chemobrain. Learn more about what it is and why it happens.

Woman cutting fresh vegetables on cutting board.

The Diet That Reduces Your Risk of Alzheimer’s

Where’s your plate? Here’s how eating turkey and drinking wine (in moderation) can boost brain power.

woman in the fog in the woods

In an SPMS Cog Fog?

The mental fuzziness that often accompanies secondary progressive multiple sclerosis can be annoying, embarrassing, or down-right scary. Boost your brain function with these tips.

Young man and old man playing chess in the park

Your Parent With Dementia Needs Help, but Won't Admit It

Here’s how to maintain their dignity and offer choices.

Adult son hugging senior mother.

Why Do Women Get Alzheimer’s Disease More Than Men?

Little research has focused on the fact that women are more likely to get Alzheimer’s—until now.

Happy couple after tennis match on court.

The Truth About Preventing Memory Loss

Doing puzzles and taking supplements aren’t going to cut it. The good news? Warding off dementia is probably easier than you think.

Young woman trying to remember something.

Which Is Easier on Your Brain, Forgetting or Remembering?

If you’re of a certain age, you may find it hard to believe that forgetting something takes more mental effort — more brain power — than trying to remember it.

Stressed man working as a computer programmer.

Stress Linked to Memory Loss, Smaller Brain in Middle Age

Adults in their 40s and 50s with high cortisol levels linked to stress perform worse on memory and cognitive function tests and have smaller brain volumes..

Playful young couple noses

For Better Memory, Breathe Through Your Nose?

A Swedish study confirms early research and suggests that nose breathing may help improve memory.