Risk Factors

Latest

Sleep Apnea: Daytime Sleepiness Signals Heart Risk

A new study shows that adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who experience excessive daytime sleepiness have a significantly higher risk for heart disease.

By HC Editorial Staff

Your Partner's Porn Habit Could Fuel an Eating Disorder

Women whose husband or boyfriend regularly watches pornography are more likely to develop an eating disorder, according to a study that shows a link.

By HC Editorial Staff

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Signs, Symptoms, and Treatments

If you have diabetes, you should know the signs, symptoms, and treatments for diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition.

By Mary Shomon

Diet Soda Danger for Older Women: Stroke

Postmenopausal women who drink multiple diet drinks per day have a higher risk for stroke than women who don’t drink beverages with artificial sweeteners.

By Diane Domina

Do Women Ignore the Alcohol-Breast Cancer Link?

Middle-aged women aren’t getting the message that there’s a proven link between alcohol consumption and higher breast cancer risk, say researchers.

By Diane Domina

Obesity Linked to Nearly 1 in 20 Cancers Worldwide

As of 2016, 40 percent of adults (that’s nearing half the world population) and almost 20 percent of kids worldwide are overweight or clinically obese.

By Amy Hendel, P.A.

Survivors Reduce Cancer Death Risk with Diet

Cancer survivors can lower their risk of cancer-related death in the future by up to 65 percent through a diverse, low fat diet.

By Amy Hendel, P.A.

8 Ways Schizophrenia Changes Your Life

From getting the right support to changing your sleep habits, schizophrenia alters your life. Here are just a few ways.

By Eileen Bailey

Can Eating Dairy Reduce Your Diabetes Risk?

Learn how certain dairy products — like milk, cheese, and yogurt — can affect your appetite, weight, and metabolism when you have diabetes.

By Mary Shomon

Type 2 Diabetes Drugs Linked to Higher Cardiovascular Risk

Researchers report sulfonylurea and insulin drugs can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease compared to other drugs. Here’s what you need to know.

By Mary Shomon